Sugar types

So from my previous post I began looking into sugar types and the recommended substitutes.  There is allot of conflicting information but I know fore sure we just need to LIMIT our sugar intake as much as possible. Please read and then do your own research as who knows how accurate sites and information can be.  I am now looking into date, beet and coconut sugars (coconut palm) to compare to stevia and xylitol.  Please see the attached information with a general overview of the types of sugar.

I am not going to be using honey to bake with anymore as I have realized it looses all nutritional properties and also has a high glycemic index. I do however believe a little local (within a 5 mile radius) honey in smoothies or on toast in small quantities have helped my ragweed allergies.  Also, why else would God have created bee’s to produce honey??

I have underlined key things from the sugars I am trying to decide between.  I would prefer from a natural source and the least processed.

 

Recommended Maximum Dose: The World Health Organization recommends that we limit our intake of added sugars to no more than 10% of total calories. That comes to about 50 grams of sugar, or the equivalent of 4 tablespoons of granulated sugar for a person eating 2000 calories a day. One tablespoon of granulated sugar is equal to about 12 grams. The American Heart Association would like to see this figure at 5% — no more than 100 calories a day from added sugar for most women, and no more than 150 calories a day for most men. That’s about 2 tablespoons of added sugar for women and 3 for men.

The research* shows that sugary liquids in quantity, in a short period of time, are poison to the body. Drinking sugar forces your liver to convert the fructose to dangerous fats. And drinking just one can of soda is all you need to get your daily maximum requirement of sugar! So — soda and sweetened (and un-sweetened!) fruit juices are now considered the new poisons. (See chart below) If you are going to imbibe, it is much better to eat your sugar, versus drinking it. In vegetables and fruits, the sugars are mixed in with fiber, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and beneficial phytonutrients, all which moderate any negative metabolic effects.

Table sugar is about 50% fructose, 50% glucose. These two simple sugars glucose and fructose are processed by our bodies differently. Glucose is metabolized by just about every cell of our body. Fructose is metabolized by the liver. So, consuming fructose is a lot more work for your liver than consuming starch (glucose). Plus, fructose metabolism is about twice as fast as glucose metabolism, thereby hitting your system faster and more furiously. And, what is hitting your system is triglycerides (fat in your blood), free fatty acids and LDL (bad) cholesterol. And unlike glucose, fructose does not cause the release of insulin from the pancreas, so it has no regulator. After eating 120 calories of glucose, one calorie is stored as fat. After 120 calories of fructose, 40 calories are stored as fat.(Link) Simply put liquid fructose = fat. Fructose (outside of whole fruits and vegetables) is bad! Watch the video ‘Sugar: The Bitter Truth‘ below.

People who overindulge in sugar have fatty livers, high blood triglyceride levels, elevated LDL (bad) cholesterol, high uric acid levels, may develop insulin resistance and a state of chronic inflammation and have a greater risk of heart attack, kidney stones, high blood pressure, low bone mineral density and cancer. Not to mention dental cavities and depletion of vitamins and minerals. Our body’s need (but can also manufacture) glucose, but they do not ‘need’ fructose.

So, how are we supposed to make the occasional pie or cake without feeling like we are poisoning our family? First the candidates:
Ends in “ose” = a sugar.
Ends in “itol” = a sugar alcohol
Disaccharide = two sugars joined together

     Agave: The highly processed pulp of a desert-dwelling succulent plant. Agave is high in fructose, different brands range from 56-92% fructose. It is about 33 percent sweeter than sugar. Very high fructose – steer clear.

 Aspartame: Sold under the names Equal, NutraSweet, AminoSweet. 100% artificial chemicals = poison! Artificial sweeteners = artificial reactions. Aspartame is now the most used artificial sweetener in the world. A University of Liverpool study showed that aspartame could be toxic to brain cells when mixed with yellow food coloring. Researchers have found that one harmful breakdown product of aspartame is formaldehyde.*

Do not use aspartam- please stay far far away from it.

Barley Malt Syrup: Sprouted barley grains are dried quickly. Then the dried sprouts are slowly cooked so that they form a syrup. Digested slowly. About half as sweet as sugar. A molasses flavor.

  Beet Sugar: Is derived from the refining of sugar beets. It is processed into sucrose. Beware of GM sugar beets.

Brown Sugar: Refined white sugar with a bit of molasses added back into it.

Cane Juice and Cane Syrup: Produced from squeezed sugar cane juice. It’s less refined and so has a bit more color and flavor from the sugar cane.

Coconut Palm: Unrefined, organic best. Although imported, it is sustainable because coconut palms grow in bio-diverse ecosystems, rather than huge mono-crop farms like sugar cane. 15 calories per teaspoon. Low glycemic level of 35. Lots of micro-nutrients.

Confectioners’ Sugar: Granulated white sugar ground into a fine powder, sometimes with a bit of cornstarch.

Corn Sweeteners and Corn Syrup: Made by milling corn to produce corn starch, then processing with enzymes and acids to yield corn syrup. May contain between 20% and 98% glucose. Also called “glucose syrup.” Still highly processed. HFCS is below.

Date Sugar: Derived from dates. Lots of fructose. **I do not like the high fructose in this.

Demerara: Comes from pressed sugar cane that’s steamed. The water is evaporated out, leaving large and coarse crystals.
Dextrose: Another name for glucose.

Erythritol: A ployol (sugar alcohol) resembles sugar in consistency and taste but has a caloric value near zero. Since the human body does not have any enzymes that can break down erythritol, it is not metabolized and is excreted unchanged in the urine. See more below under sugar alcohols. (Organic Zero a brand name)

Fructose: Fruit sugar that occurs naturally in honey, dates, raisins, grapes, apples, etc.. Now, most often fructose is produced from corn syrup. Fructose is 50% sweeter then cane or beet sugar. Fructose is metabolized by the liver. If liquid fructose is ingested quickly and in quantity the liver becomes stressed and therefore turns most all the fructose to fat. Fructose tends to promote an increase in triglycerides in the blood, which increases the risk of heart disease. Fructose also increases levels of uric acid in the body. Excess fructose causes a number of serious health issues. Dr. Robert Lustig calls fructose ‘evil’!

Fruit Juice Concentrate: Syrups made by heating fruit juices to remove their water, then treating with enzymes and filtering, then re-adding fruit flavors. Lots of fructose!

Glucose: Also known as dextrose. A simple sugar that is metabolized by most every cell in the body. Also called blood sugar because it circulates in your blood. It fuels your cells. The body keeps blood glucose in a set range, through careful administration of insulin. The pancreas makes insulin. Our cells cannot use glucose without the help of insulin. Most all carbohydrates contain glucose, either alone, as in starch and glycogen, or together with another monosaccharide, as in sucrose and lactose. Glucose is 20% less sweet than sugar.
Glucose Syrup: Any liquid starch consisting of carbohydrates. Also called corn syrup when its main ingredient is cornstarch. Can be made from any source of starch; corn, wheat, rice and potatoes are the most common sources. The main benefit of this syrup over regular granulated sugar is its non-crystallizing properties.

Granulated White Sugar: Also known as table sugar, or pure crystallized sucrose, made by processing raw sugar from sugar cane or sugar beets.

High Fructose Corn Syrup: Also called glucose-fructose syrup. A combination of fructose and glucose made by processing corn syrup. Enzymatic processing converts some of the corn syrup’s glucose into fructose to produce a desired sweetness. The resulting syrup is sweeter and more soluble. HFCS 55 (mostly used in soft drinks) is approximately 55% fructose and 42% glucose. A recent University of Southern California analysis of popular sodas (all sweetened with HFCS) found that the percent of fructose can be as high as 65 percent.(Link) As much as 60% of the sugar consumed in the US is actually HFCS. A very controversial product. More than one study has detected unsafe mercury levels in HFCS. In a Princeton study rats given HFCS gained 48% of their body weight in fat, a much greater weight gain than rats fed sugar. This is the equivalent of a 200 pound person gaining 96 pounds.(Link)
High Maltose Corn Syrup: A highly processed corn syrup with a high maltose content. Maltose is two bonded units of glucose. No fructose is present at all, and it is very easy for the body to break down. Our bodies create an enzyme, maltase that easily breaks down maltose into glucose. (Link)
Honey: A mix of glucose, fructose and sucrose created from nectar made by bees. Honey typically has a fructose/glucose ratio similar to HFCS 55, as well as containing some sucrose and other sugars.

Invert Sugar: Used as a food additive to preserve freshness and create smoothness, this is sucrose broken down into its respective parts – fructose and glucose.

Jaggery: Is unrefined sugarcane or palm sap heated to 200 °C. It comes in blocks, bricks, cups or pastes. It contains up to 50% sucrose, up to 20% invert sugars, up to 20% moisture, and the remainder is made up of other insoluble matter such as wood ash, proteins and fibers. It is called Palm Sugar when made from the date palm or sugar date palm. Known by many names throughout the world such as tapa dulce and rapadura.

Lactose: Sugar that occurs naturally in milk. Derived from whey. Lactose is about 20% as sweet as sugar.

Maltodextrin: A highly processed powdered sweetener enzymatically derived from any starch, resulting in a mixture of Glucose, Maltose, Oligosaccharides and Polysaccharides. In the US, the starch is usually corn, rice or potato; in Europe, it is commonly wheat. Maltodextrin is easily digestible, being absorbed as rapidly as glucose, and might be either moderately sweet or almost flavorless. A good thickener.

Maltose: (aka Malt Sugar) Starch and malt broken down (mashed) into simple sugars and used commonly in beer, bread and baby food. Produced when amylase breaks down the starch of germinated seeds, such as barley. Maltose is a disaccharide where fructose is a monosaccharide. Maltose is one third as sweet as sucrose.

 

     Maple Syrup: Boiled down maple tree sap. Barely processed, pure maple syrup is a good source of minerals like manganese and zinc. Keep your mind open to Grade B which could contain even more minerals than A. 17 calories per teaspoon.

     Molasses: The thick, dark syrup that’s leftover when sugar beets or sugar cane are processed into granulated sugar. Black strap is loaded with vitamins, minerals and trace elements naturally present in the sugar cane plant and is a good source of iron, vitamin B6, potassium, calcium and magnesium.

     Muscovado: Unrefined. Made by pressing sugarcane and then cooking it slightly before allowing it to dry. Full of molasses and minerals. A good substitute for brown sugar, tends to be sticky. Store in tightly sealed jar.

     Rice Syrup (Brown Rice Syrup): Derived by cooking down rice or rice flour with enzymes (usually from dried barley sprouts) to break down starches. The final product is 45% maltose, 3% glucose, and 52% maltotriose. The syrup breaks down rather slowly, providing more of a time-release energy flow than sugar. About 13 calories per teaspoon and is less sweet than sugar. Tastes like butterscotch or caramel.

     Saccharin: aka Sweet’n Low. Artificial sweeteners = artificial reactions.

     Sorbitol: Also known as glucitol, a sugar alcohol. See below…

     Stevia Rebaudiana: Also known as sweet leaf, sugarleaf. Stevia plants are dried and subjected to a water extraction process. 300 times sweeter than sugar with zero calories. Too good to be true – yes, a bitter aftertaste. Caution as to the brand Truvia – it contains a chemically modified stevia.

     Sucanat: (Brand, Sugar Cane Natural) Made by crushing sugar cane, extracting the juice and heating. Sucanat still contains the cane’s natural molasses, it has a deep brown color and a molasses flavor. It can be substituted for brown sugar in any recipe.

     Sucralose: (aka Splenda, SucraPlus, Candys, Cukren, E955 and Nevella) An artificial sweetener. 600 times as sweet as table sugar, twice as sweet as saccharin, and 3.3 times as sweet as aspartame. Lots of steps of chlorination in its processing.

     Sucrose: The chemical name for granulated white table sugar which can be produced from either sugar cane or sugar beets. It is broken down during digestion into a mixture of 50% fructose and 50% glucose. Each molecule of sucrose eaten means a molecule of glucose goes straight to the blood and one of fructose goes straight to the liver. Sulfur dioxide is added before evaporation to bleach the sugar.

     Sugar Alcohols: Also know as polyols, derived from a plant sugar which is extracted by differing means, then reduced and then hydrogenated, then recrystallized. Part of their structure resembles sugar and part is similar to alcohol, yet they are neither sugar nor alcohol, they just resemble their molecular structure. Contain about 2.6 calories per gram. Occur naturally in plant products such as fruits, berries, starches, seaweeds.

Products which use sugar alcohols can be called “sugar free”
Each sugar alcohol acts differently in the body.
Forms of sugar alcohol:

Erythritol: Glucose is liquefied then fermented with a yeast, then crystallized. Erythritol is absorbed into the blood stream via the small intestine and then excreted unchanged in the urine. Erythritol has very small molecules and so passes directly through the system without metabolizing. Since it never makes it to the large intestine, this sugar alcohol does not cause the bloating and gas that are often associated with other sugar alcohols. 70% as sweet as sucrose. Heat-stable. People mix it with Stevia. (Organic Zero is a brand name)

     Hydrogenated starch hydrolysates: HSH is made from starches (wheat, corn, potato) and then by using hydrolysis, dextrin is created. Hydrogenation then coverts the dextrins into sugar alcohols. 40 – 90 percent of the sweetness of sugar. HSH do not crystallize and are used in confections, baked goods and mouthwashes. Adds texture and increases viscosity.

Isomalt: Is made from sucrose. It is a mixture of gluco-mannitol and gluco-sorbitol. Isomalt is only partially digested in the intestines and behaves much like fiber in the digestive tract. Is 45 – 65 percent as sweet as sugar and does not tend to lose its sweetness or break down during the heating process. Isomalt absorbs little water, so it is often used in hard candies, toffee, cough drops and lollipops.

Lactitol: Made from milk sugar (lactose). Lactitol is partially absorbed as glucose by the body and the remaining amount is fermented in the large intestine. Therefore may cause distress in the large colon. 30-40 percent as sweet as sugar, but its taste and solubility profile resembles sugar so it is often found in sugar-free ice cream, chocolate, candy, baked goods, preserves and chewing gums.

Maltitol: Made by hydrogenation of maltose obtained from starch. 75-90% percent as sweet as sugar. It gives a creamy texture to foods. And since it is so like sucrose it is found often. Maltitol is slowly absorbed in the intestine and excessive consumption can have a laxative effect and produce intestinal gas, bloating, and diarrhea.

Mannitol: Is mainly extracted from seaweed for use in food manufacturing. Has 50-70 percent of the relative sweetness of sugar. Mannitol lingers in the intestines for a long time and therefore often causes bloating and diarrhea. Mannitol is found in a wide variety of natural products, including almost all plants. Mannitol is extracted by utilizing ethanol, water, and methanol to steam and then hydrolyze the raw material. Mannitol does not absorb moisture and is used to dust chewing gum to prevent it from sticking.

Sorbitol: Is manufactured from corn syrup. 50 percent as sweet as sugar. It is often an ingredient in sugar-free gums and candies. Is found naturally in fruits and vegetables. It has less of a tendency to cause diarrhea compared to mannitol but can also aggravate irritable bowel syndrome.

Xylitol: Is also called “wood sugar” and can be extracted from corncobs, birch wood, raspberries, plums, vegetables, mushrooms and some cereals. Xylitol has the same relative sweetness as sugar. It is found in chewing gums. Xylitol is produced by hydrogenation of the raw material, which converts the sugar into an alcohol. Tooth friendly.
 
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Tagatose: Milk sugar – 92 % as sweet as sugar yet with about 1/3 of the calories. Is made via a patented two-step process. In the first step, lactose is hydrolyzed to glucose and galactose. In the second step, galactose is isomerized to D-tagatose by adding calcium hydroxide. D-tagatose is then further purified by means of demineralization and chromatography. The final product is a white crystalline substance that is greater than 99 percent pure. Only 15-20 percent of tagatose is absorbed in the small intestine. The major part of ingested tagatose is fermented in the colon by indigenous microflora, resulting in the production of short-chain fatty acids. The short chain fatty acids are absorbed almost completely and metabolized. Therefore tagatose has a minimal impact on blood glucose and is very low calorie.* Brand names Shugr, Sweet Fiber, and TheraSweet.

Turbinado Sugar: (Also known as Sugar in the Raw) Is made by crushing sugar cane to squeeze out the juice. The cane juice is evaporated and spun in a centrifuge, or ‘turbine’, producing large crystals. It retains a bit more of the natural “impurities” and a slight molasses flavor.

Article copied from:

http://www.inspirationgreen.com/all-the-different-sugars.html
NY Times – “Is Sugar Toxic
Soda Info Site: education.wichita.edu
USC Research Finds Sodas Sweetened with More High Fructose Corn Syrup Than Previously Assumed — keck.usc.edu
Sugar Alcohols: www.marksdailyapple.com
141 Reasons Sugar Ruins Your Health: nancyappleton.com

Cancer and Sugar

I have been reading a new book Titled: The Cancer Killers: The cause is the Cure.  It is a great book and I would recommend it to anyone!

One of the main reason why I have changed my diet is to prevent Cancer to the best of my ability.  Since working in the medical field I see alot of cancer and how it effects individuals, families and the overall population. It truly breaks my heart. In my transition I went from a junk food candy craving gal to a here and there sweet tooth.  Don’t get me wrong, I still struggle with wanting my sweets on a daily basis but i choose to only indulge is a VERY small amount maybe twice a week.  Mainly I just try to limit it as much as possible.  Knowing myself I can not tell myself I will never have sweets again because that just makes me crave them all the more. I have previously read several articles talking about Cancer and how it THRIVES on sugar. Ironically we feed cancer patient s ENSURE which it’s number 1 ingredient is sugar.  So we are feeding their cancer vs suffocating it.  That has stuck with me and since to the best of my knowledge and blessings I do not have cancer so I feel that the occasion intake of sugar if OK. If anyone is dealing with cancer I would highly recommend read this book and ELIMINATING sugar,  limiting even fruits, from your diet.

Did you know that the average person takes in about 1/2 a lb of sugar a day. The recommended intake of additional sugar (not including natural sugars like fruits and vegetables) is 4 tsp or less per day.  This can be figured by take the total number of sugar grams and dividing it by 4= tsp.

So if we are going to eat a little extra sweetness what should we choose?  My research is leading me in the way of Natural Herb Stevia or Xylitol .  Honey is OK but it does cause a rise in blood glucose levels- this is what I have been using so I am going to be making a change. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE stay away from natural process sweeteners.  They are lab produced and God did not make our bodies to digest them. I am looking into Beet sugars etc as well so stay tuned for that.

Below are 3 articles.  One is talking about the benefits of xylitol and the other is talking about RAW foods CURING cancer.  I wish that we could educate more people about the effects of food choice, lifestyle choices and environmental effects on our health and that we can make a difference!

I may not have cancer but I plan to incorporate these cancer fighting foods and tips into my lifestyle to in hopes to prevent ever getting it.

So check them out!:

(NaturalNews) The prevalent use of refined white cane sugar as a sweetener in foods and drinks is a serious contributing factor for a wide range of diseases, including cancer. Many alternatives, including aspartame and high-fructose – often GMO – corn syrup, are often even more dangerous to health than sugar. An excellent and unique alternative is xylitol, a sugar-like sweetener which is actually highly beneficial for health. Here is why.

For many generations, families have used the ubiquitous refined white cane sugar for sweetening drinks and foods, completely oblivious to the many health consequences.

In 2009, 50% of Americans were consuming at least half a pound of refined sugar per day in food and drink products, an incredible 180 pounds of refined sugar per year.

These are just a few of the adverse health consequences potentially arising from the use of refined cane sugar in any food or drink:

• Causes acidosis, the origin of a vast array of serious diseases
• Feeds “bad,” pathogenic bacteria in the gut, weakening the immune system
• Feeds cancer cells making primary use of sugar to multiply and grow
• Causes tooth decay
• Contributes to diabetes
• Contributes to obesity
• Causes an energy deficit, experienced as tiredness and fatigue
• Affects brain function through B vitamin and “good microbe” depletion
• Leaches vital vitamins and minerals from bones and other parts of the body
• Converts to fatty acids which are deposited in the heart, kidneys and other organs

There are literally hundreds of further deleterious effects to health.

While alternative natural sweeteners such as maple syrup, stevia, agave, molasses, fructose and others avoid some or many of these issues, they still often fail the body in two main areas – they feed bad microbes in the gut and therefore weaken the immune system, and they cause the body to become more acidic, the root of countless health conditions.

Why xylitol is so different from sugar and highly beneficial to health

Although xylitol looks, tastes and behaves exactly like a sugar, it is actually not a sugar at all but a “sugar alcohol.” This does not mean that it is alcoholic but that it contains five carbon atoms as opposed to the six carbon atoms of a sugar.

Xylitol is all natural, being extracted mostly from the bark of birch trees, the original source, but also from many other fibrous vegetables. A word of caution – xylitol is being increasingly made from corn husks. Corn husk xylitol should always be avoided on the basis that the corn from which it was processed may well be GMO.

Here are just a few of the numerous health benefits of xylitol

• Looks, tastes and behaves like sugar and is totally interchangeable
• Suitable for diabetics due to low glycemic index
• Antibacterial, antiviral for protecting against and fighting infections
• Antifungal, fighting candida, yeast and other fungal infections
• Alkalising, thereby helping to maintain the body at a healthy alkaline pH
• Probiotic and therefore feeds “good microbes” to strengthen the immune system
• Anti-pathogenic microbial, killing bad microbes that weaken the immune system
• Stabilizes insulin and hormone levels in harmony with the endocrine system
• Reduces craving for food and calories, thereby assisting weight loss
• Beneficial for helping sinus, ear and nose infections

Xylitol looks, tastes and behaves like sugar without all the harmful health consequences while being extremely beneficial for general health.

Sources:

http://nature.com

http://xylitol.org

http://science.naturalnews.com

http://www.naturalnews.com/042855_xylitol_safe_alternatives_sugar_substitute.html

(NaturalNews) There is a 75-year “CON” known as Western Medicine, but it’s a hush-hush topic in the news and in newspapers and magazines. Although medical doctors and surgeons are experts at fixing broken bones or removing animal fat from clogged arteries, the “pharmaceutical nation” known as the USA is caving in on itself, but nobody is allowed to talk about it on TV, or they lose all their sponsors. There is also a world of medicine known as organic food, but some people want to cook it, fry it, boil it or broil it, or even worse, grill it out, and that LIVE food becomes DEAD food, useless to the body, which needs nutrients for immunity, cellular health, vitality and sustainability.
(http://www.naturalnews.com)

Is there a “CANCER INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX” in the USA?

So why don’t oncologists talk about RAW foods, which are full of nutrients, oxygen for the cells (the cure for cancer) and the RAW REGIMEN when people are on their “death beds” or “sent home to die” with pancreatic cancer, liver cancer or cancer of some other organ that you have to have to survive? When cancer spreads to the lymph nodes or the spinal column, why don’t doctors, surgeons and oncologists tell their patients about these RAW foods that give them the best chance at recovery? And I mean permanent remission and recovery. Are these “Western Medicine” practitioners evil, money-grabbing cons or are they just ignorant, miseducated and unknowing? How could that be? How could you be trained to do surgery or read lab results and not know ONE THING about nutrition? Do some of them know but are not saying because their income would drop to about 25% of what they make now, using dangerous chemicals to treat a chemical-driven disease? No oncologist in the world suggests medicinal mushrooms, and take a big guess why! (http://www.canceractive.com)

The answer to every one of the questions above is to just listen to the people who DO KNOW about RAW foods and can tell wonderful stories of their own recovery from deadly cancer and why they chose nutrition over chemo, surgery and radiation. Learn from honest souls who share their most personal journeys, through and past the “cons” of the cancer-industrial complex. Consider the fact that even scientists have found a natural cure for cancer, and people TESTIFY in court that it works, even for children with “terminal” cancer: (http://www.burzynskiclinic.com).

Natural News has a few other heart-warming stories about real people who survived “lethal” cancer and lived to share their stories with the world: Jay Kordich, known as the “father of vegetable juicing,” says raw foods are responsible for overcoming his own bladder cancer. One of his followers, John Kohler, has been on a raw food diet since 1995, primarily enjoying juices. Not only did he survive his spinal meningitis, but he also lost weight and is living life more healthfully than ever.
(http://www.naturalnews.com)

Don’t Eat Cancer

Put it this way: if you were getting sick from moldy bread, would you look for a cure from a vaccine, or medicine, or consider surgery, while you kept on eating more moldy bread every day? It’s not that hard to filter chemicals from your daily intake. Check out Fooducate – the free phone app that scans the barcodes of foods and drinks, tells you if it’s GMO and rates it for quality! (http://www.fooducate.com)

Check out great RAW FOOD regimens: (http://www.naturalnews.com).

One-and-a-half million people every year fight cancer and need to know about RAW foods, and we could end this “search for the cure” that the masses are CONNED into believing is worthwhile. The cure is here! The cure lives in nutrition. Appreciate the fact that… if you don’t “eat” cancer, it doesn’t “eat” you.
(http://programs.webseed.com)

Sources for this article include:

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.fooducate.com

http://www.burzynskiclinic.com

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.canceractive.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

ttp://www.naturalnews.com/042848_organic_produce_cancer_cure_sick_car_industry.html

Nutritional Healing from Cancer:  The Fundamentals of an Alkaline Diet

There is something that every cancer patient should hear from their oncologist when they are first diagnosed.   They should be told that by making certain dietary changes, they could increase their chances of healing from cancer dramatically, no matter what course of treatment they pursue.

Cancer patients should be informed that nutrition is their first and best defense when starting down the path of healing from cancer.  Information should be provided about how to switch to an alkaline diet,[i] composed of primarily vegetables, with a small amount of fruit, grains and protein.  This diet is similar to the ketogenic[ii] diet, which is much discussed in the oncology press, but with further reduction in total protein consumption as well as grains, processed fats and sugar, to help control inflammation in the body.

Instead, the dietary information provided to cancer patients is an afterthought, and amazingly, usually includes foods and meal preparation techniques that are known promoters of cancer progression.[iii]  Clearly, there is a disconnect between very well documented information on diet and cancer progression and those who communicate most often with cancer patients – the oncology teams.

The modern way of life, particularly in fast-paced Western countries, does not lend itself to an anti-cancer, alkaline diet.  Convenience food products, microwave meals, packaged snacks and fast food dominate many people’s daily menu.  It should come as no surprise that these foods are not optimal if you are battling cancer.

But what should a newly diagnosed cancer patient do, right away, to help themselves prepare for the treatments to come and increase their chances for healing?

Here are the six most important dietary changes every cancer patient should make.  While they seem daunting at first, really what the cancer patient needs to do is to go back to eating in the way that people have done since the beginning of time:  fresh food, in season, simply prepared.

Most people in the Western world today eat a diet that promotes inflammation and increases intracellular pH, a condition called latent acidosis – understood to provide a perfect environment for cancer to proliferate.  A properly constructed alkaline diet will improve your intracellular pH over time, and is the best defense against continuous inflammation in the body.  It is composed primarily of organic leafy green vegetables, herbs and spices, root vegetables, onions, garlic, leek and chives, broccoli, cauliflower and cabbages, beans, lentils and peas and nuts and seeds, combined with a small amount (a cup or two per day) of non-gluten grains such as rice.  A serving of between two and four ounces of clean fish, organic poultry or grass-fed meat, several times per week, can be part of a healthy, alkaline oriented diet.  Two to three pieces of whole fresh fruit a day help balance your vitamin and mineral consumption.  The more of your vegetables and fruits you enjoy raw, the better.[iv]

Cancer cells use more glucose (sugar) per unit of time than other cells.  Sugar metabolism creates acid, which also supports cancer progression.  Further, a diet high in sugars, including fruits, triggers the insulin response.  If you frequently eat sugar or fruit throughout the day, you suppress your immune function while increasing the insulin levels in your body, creating insulin resistance.  Insulin resistance has been directly tied to cancer proliferation.   Processed sugar depletes magnesium in the body, another contributor to cancer proliferation.  High fructose corn syrup, because of its processing methodology, is high in mercury, a cancer-promoting toxin in the body.  The recommendation to eliminate sugar includes sugar in all its forms, even “natural” sugars like honey and agave, as well as white sugar and high fructose corn syrup.  Enjoy unsweetened applesauce, two or three figs or dried apricots, or a piece of fresh pineapple if you need a sweet treat.  Moderation with fruit is important, as fructose has been shown to increase the rate of cancer cell division as much as two-fold – more than other forms of sugar.[vi]

Glutinous grains cause inflammation.  Inflammation promotes cancer progression.   This means avoiding high-gluten grains such as wheat, spelt or rye, including the whole grains.  Pastas, cereals, bread, muffins, cakes, crackers, cookies and other baked goods are excluded from an alkaline, cancer-suppression diet.  Cancer patients should enjoy whole, non-gluten grains such as rice, buckwheat, quinoa, millet and amaranth.  However, using “gluten free” prepared products is a mistake, as most of them have added sugar or processed oils and will therefore fall outside of the alkaline diet parameters for cancer.

Cow dairy has been identified in a very large study compiled by Prof. (Emeritus) T. Colin Campbell, PhD, Cornell University as one of the most cancer promoting foods.[viii]  Strangely enough, it is the protein that is the culprit – casein protein.  High protein yogurts made with added powdered milk or whey are even more cancer promoting than plain milk, yogurt or cheese.  However, all dairy products should be eliminated from the diet when you are fighting cancer.  Dairy products create inflammation, cause bone deterioration (yes it is true, because of the high acid production during digestion of dairy) and promote cancer progression in a similar fashion to sugar.

Use only natural, cold-pressed olive oil, coconut oil or avocado oil – organic where possible.  These oils are naturally anti-inflammatory, thus provide a soothing and healing benefit to inflamed and potentially cancerous cells in the body.  Coconut oil in particular has also been shown to have a mild antibacterial/antifungal effect, helpful for cancer patients with a lowered immune function, as well as direct anti-cancer properties.  Oils that should be eliminated from a cancer-suppression diet include corn, soy, canola, safflower or sunflower oils.    Not only are the commercial versions of these oils produced from genetically modified plants – believed to increase cancer risk – most of them are highly processed.  Processed oils, including hydrogenated (hard) oils and margarines, have been prepared at high heat to improve shelf life.  This changes the oil molecules so that instead of acting as a natural conductor for all the electrical messaging in your body, these molecules create “dead spots” in your cells because they cannot conduct electricity.  This interferes with healthy cell function and can promote cancer progression.  Essentially cancer cells are cells that no longer respond to intracellular messaging and proliferate without purpose, impacting other cells.

Eliminate alcohol consumption.  Eliminate the consumption of bottled, canned or frozen fruit juice as they have high concentrations of sugar and many are highly acid forming.  Fresh vegetable and fruit juice that you make at home or from a juice bar is encouraged, however emphasis is on vegetable juice.   Reduce coffee consumption to one cup per day or less, and increase consumption of clean water, lightly brewed green tea (not black tea), sage tea, ginger tea and peppermint tea as both hot and cold drinks.  Drink the juice of a whole, organic lemon in hot or cold water several times per day.  Drink fresh carrot or carrot-beet juice daily, as these are healthy, alkaline juices for a cancer diet.

While this may sound daunting if you have enjoyed the convenience of restaurant or fast food meals or purchasing a prepared meal, this switch is easier than you think.  If you cook at home, it means eliminating a few foods and focusing on a few others to modify your usual recipes.

Salad is always a good choice whether at home or eating out.  Whether you are making your own salad or ordering a salad in a restaurant, include grated carrots, beets, cucumbers, endives, escarole, cherry tomatoes, fennel, cabbage and spinach in any combination, in addition to or instead of romaine lettuce or mesclun greens, then dress with extra virgin olive oil and fresh lemon on the side at table, rather than tossing the salad with prepared dressing.  Add some garbanzo or white beans and you’ll be completely satisfied.

Japanese sushi traditionally features a large selection of fresh vegetable rolls.  If you are dining out, ask for gluten-free (tamari) soy sauce, order a few rolls and some Japanese green tea, and you can enjoy a quick, satisfying lunch or dinner.  A bonus comes in the seaweed wrappers – full of minerals from the sea.  Just avoid standard soy sauce as it has wheat in it (gluten), the Teriyaki sauce (gluten) as well as anything that is brightly colored or contains mayonnaise, as these are not on the list of healthy options.  For immune deficient cancer patients, best to stay away from raw fish sushi.

Indian food features many vegetarian choices, with plenty of spice and vegetables.  Unfortunately many Indian restaurants use a lot of rape-seed/canola oil in cooking, which is not recommended.  Enquire about how the food is prepared and if there are some ingredients that are not optimal, just eat carefully.  A good choice is channa masala (chickpea curry) with poppadum (lentil cracker-bread) and vegetable biryani rice.  Nann, chapatti, paratha, puri and roti breads are typically made from wheat flour and should be avoided.

Italian cuisine is a bit more difficult since the basis of Italian cuisine is pasta made from wheat with added cheese.  However, cooking at home you have endless options, and more Italian restaurants are offering a gluten free pasta choice.  Many Italian menus feature dishes based on marinara (vegetarian) tomato sauce.  Select preparations with no cheese and only eat a small appetizer portion of fish or meat, if any at all.  Steamed or lightly sautéed vegetable dishes such as broccoli rabe or spinach with garlic are superior alkaline choices, as are salads made with chopped and grated raw vegetables.  Since olive oil, garlic, tomato, vegetables, herbs and lemon are critical to Italian cooking, it is quite possible make excellent alkaline selections if you order thoughtfully or cook Italian food at home.

And of course, you have to just let the breadbasket and the desert list pass you by.

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/nutrition-information-every-cancer-patient-should-know

GMO and your gut

I found this article and just proves more and more how what we eat effects our organs is more ways than we may know.  It amazes me how disease progress along with the changes in our dietary habits (fast food, GMO, processed) over the years.  There is a high correlation between the two but still so many do not see it.

Many of our disease process start in our GI tract so keeping a health gut is key!  Here is just one article that show us this.

 

This article brings up a good point.  We should be eating organic foods to avoid contaminants.  I have several thoughts and conflicts in this area.  When I started I was totally organic.  To be honest I am not made of money and that was really expensive when all you eat are fruits and vegetables.  I did the dirty dozen but I found it difficult to find those things organically without paying an arm and a leg or some could only be found organically in season.  So currently I do not do organic food but I spray with vinegar water.  I would appreciate anyone’s thoughts or ideas on this.  In the back of my mind I keep thinking I need to do whatever gets me eating the most fruits and vegetables but on the other hand if I am eating more but those are contaminated and causing more organ damage.  Whats a girl to do??

 

If you are one of the approximately 70 million Americans who suffer from a chronic digestive issue, then you should know that the food you choose to consume could be carrying a gene that is designed to intentionally cause intestinal rupture. Genetically modified foods that contain Bt toxin, a built-in insecticide that inherently works by imploding the stomach of the creature that is feasting on it, could very well be contributing to your intestinal angst.

What exactly is Bt and how does it work?
Bacillus thuringiensis is a naturally occurring substance that is found in soil bacterium. Since the mid-nineties, some engineered crops have been modified to harbor this toxin within their genetic codes. The idea is to produce crops that have a built-in insecticide, in order to reduce the amount of food that is lost to insect invasion. As if this action alone wasn’t enough, these crops are also being sprayed with more pesticide that coats the outer area of the plant. This way, these particular crops are being protected against predators twice.

“So-called ‘Bt corn’ is equipped with a gene from the soil bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which produces Bt-toxin—a pesticide that breaks open the stomach of certain insects and kills them.”  – Dr. Mercola

Monsanto Corporation is the industrial giant that is responsible for most of our genetically modified foods, and for Bt being inserted into our food supply. Roundup, a plant pesticide, is Monsanto’s current, main product. This is the same company that has previously ensured the safety of other products, such as DDT and Agent Orange.  We now know that both of these substances are incredibly toxic to human health, despite being originally deemed safe just like genetically modified foods, Bt toxin, and glyphosate (the active ingredient in Roundup) are now.

What are the studies saying?
In Jeffrey Smith’s Genetic Roulette, he documents 65 health risks associated with genetically modified foods, including the fact that rats that were fed genetically modified potatoes with Bt had evidence of intestinal rupture.  All 65 of the health risks can be found on the Institute for Responsible Technology’s website.

Despite what Monsanto has said about the safety of Bt, a recent study done by the Institute of Science in Society has concluded that Bt is indeed harmful to human health:
“Experiments were performed to assess both cell death and cell membrane integrity, as the pesticidal activity of Bt toxins results from creating pores in the membrane of cells in the insect gut… this study indicates that Bt toxins are not inert on human cells, and may indeed be toxic.”

 

Bt is also known to kill human kidney cells,  and, in a recent study, has been found in 93% of pregnant women’s unborn babies.  And yet, we’re still all adamantly being told that there is no way for humans to possibly experience any negative side effects from eating Bt crops. In fact, the University of California San Diego has said, “Bt products are found to be safe for use in the environment and with mammals.”  Two paragraphs down, they go on to say “Bt is found to be an eye irritant on test rabbits.”

Let’s take a look at the facts
Genetically modified foods that carry the Bt toxin first came to American households in 1996.  Between the years of 1979 and 1998, the number of Americans to suffer from Crohn’s Disease (a debilitating autoimmune disease of the large bowel) bounced back and forth between 225 per 100,000 people to 300 per 100,000 people.  In 2000, that number shot up to 375 per 100,000 people, and has been on the rise ever since. Ambulatory care visits from those who reported inflammatory bowel symptoms went from 275 per 100,000 people to 375 per 100,000 people between the years of 1994 and 1998.

Let’s do another. The number of Americans suffering from ulcerative colitis (inflammatory bowel disease) hovered between 185 per 100,000 Americans to approximately 210 per 100,000 people between the years of 1979 and 2001.  In 2002, those numbers shot to 225 per 100,000 people and have been on the rise ever since. Ambulatory care visits went from approximately 190 per 100,000 people in 1995 to about 235 per 100,000 people in 1998.
Does GMO equal IBS?

These are significant changes in bowel health that occurred within approximately 5 years of Bt hitting the supermarket. This rise in altered bowel health does not follow the general population increase, but it does make sense when considering the fact that we are consuming more and more food that has been genetically encoded with this toxic pesticide.

How do we avoid exposure to Bt?
Although there are other crops that are being grown using Bt (such as potatoes), corn is generally the most worrisome. This is because corn (or maize) is in almost all processed foods (corn meal, corn syrup, corn starch, corn flour, etc.) Soy is also a concern, because as with corn, a lot of foods contain GMO soy
embedded within the list of ingredients, such as soy lecithin and soy starch.

For non-meat eaters, who generally tend to consume more soy products than meat-eaters, it is important to look for non-GMO, organic soy product foods when consuming tofu, tempeh, and any other soy derived-products.

Because genetically modified foods in the United States are not required to bear a label notifying the consumer that it is a “frankenfood”, the only real way to avoid it is to eat a very clean, mindful, organic, naked whole food diet. However, when buying packaged food, look for the NON-GMO label or NON-GMO PROJECT logo.
From:
http://www.jenniferbrowne.org/

 

http://nakedfoodmagazine.com/does-gmo-equal-ibs/

Breast Cancer and Carotenoids

Circulating Carotenoids and Risk of Breast Cancer: Pooled Analysis of Eight Prospective Studies

  1. A. Heather Eliassen,
  2. Sara J. Hendrickson,
  3. Louise A. Brinton,
  4. Julie E. Buring,
  5. Hannia Campos,
  6. Qi Dai,
  7. Joanne F. Dorgan,
  8. Adrian A. Franke,
  9. Yu-tang Gao,
  10. Marc T. Goodman,
  11. Göran Hallmans,
  12. Kathy J. Helzlsouer,
  13. Judy Hoffman-Bolton,
  14. Kerstin Hultén,
  15. Howard D. Sesso,
  16. Anne L. Sowell,
  17. Rulla M. Tamimi,
  18. Paolo Toniolo,
  19. Lynne R. Wilkens,
  20. Anna Winkvist,
  21. Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte,
  22. Wei Zheng and
  23. Susan E. Hankinson

+Author Affiliations


  1. Affiliations of authors: Channing Division of Network Medicine (AHE, RMT, SEH) and Division of Preventive Medicine (JEB, HDS), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology (AHE, SJH, RMT, SEH) and Department of Nutrition (SJH, HC), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (LAB); Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (QD, WZ); Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (JFD); University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI (AAF, MTG, LRW); Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai, China (Y-tG); Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden (GH, KH); George W. Comstock Center for Public Health Research and Prevention, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (KJH, JH-B); The Prevention and Research Center, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, MD (KJH); Division of Health Studies, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (ALS); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (PT) and Department of Environmental Medicine (AZ-J), New York University Cancer Institute, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY; Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden (AW); Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (SEH).
  1. Correspondence to: A. Heather Eliassen, ScD, Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 (e-mail: heather.eliassen@channing.harvard.edu).
  • Received February 10, 2012.
  • Revision received October 2, 2012.
  • Accepted October 4, 2012.

Abstract

Background Carotenoids, micronutrients in fruits and vegetables, may reduce breast cancer risk. Most, but not all, past studies of circulating carotenoids and breast cancer have found an inverse association with at least one carotenoid, although the specific carotenoid has varied across studies.

Methods We conducted a pooled analysis of eight cohort studies comprising more than 80% of the world’s published prospective data on plasma or serum carotenoids and breast cancer, including 3055 case subjects and 3956 matched control subjects. To account for laboratory differences and examine population differences across studies, we recalibrated participant carotenoid levels to a common standard by reassaying 20 plasma or serum samples from each cohort together at the same laboratory. Using conditional logistic regression, adjusting for several breast cancer risk factors, we calculated relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using quintiles defined among the control subjects from all studies. All P values are two-sided.

Results Statistically significant inverse associations with breast cancer were observed for α-carotene (top vs bottom quintile RR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.71 to 1.05, Ptrend = .04), β-carotene (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.70 to 0.98,Ptrend = .02), lutein+zeaxanthin (RR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.70 to 1.01,Ptrend = .05), lycopene (RR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62 to 0.99, Ptrend = .02), and total carotenoids (RR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.68 to 0.96, Ptrend = .01). β-Cryptoxanthin was not statistically significantly associated with risk. Tests for heterogeneity across studies were not statistically significant. For several carotenoids, associations appeared stronger for estrogen receptor negative (ER) than for ER+ tumors (eg, β-carotene: ER: top vs bottom quintile RR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.36 to 0.77, Ptrend = .001; ER+: RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.66 to 1.04, Ptrend = .06; Pheterogeneity = .01).

Conclusions This comprehensive prospective analysis suggests women with higher circulating levels of α-carotene, β-carotene, lutein+zeaxanthin, lycopene, and total carotenoids may be at reduced risk of breast cancer.

Omega’s

VERY informative article with charts that are easy to follow.  Since we only eat salmon or some type of fish once a week I am very diligent in finding other sources.  See one of the charts below. I make sure to put chia and flax seeds in our smoothie everyday to assure we are getting enough!!  It’s the little things that can make a big difference.

What can high-omega-3 foods do for you?

  • Reduce inflammation throughout your body
  • Keep your blood from clotting excessively
  • Maintain the fluidity of your cell membranes
  • lower the amount of lipids (fats such as cholesterol and triglycerides) circulating in the bloodstream
  • decrease platelet aggregation, preventing excessive blood clotting
  • inhibit thickening of the arteries by decreasing endothelial cells’ production of a platelet-derived growth factor (the lining of the arteries is composed of endothelial cells)
  • increase the activity of another chemical derived from endothelial cells (endothelium-derived nitric oxide), which causes arteries to relax and dilate
  • reduce the production of messenger chemicals called cytokines, which are involved in the inflammatory response associated with atherosclerosis
  • reduce the risk of becoming obese and improve the body’s ability to respond to insulin by stimulating the secretion of leptin, a hormone that helps regulate food intake, body weight and metabolism, and is expressed primarily by adipocytes (fat cells)
  • help prevent cancer cell growth

What conditions or symptoms indicate a need for more high-omega-3 foods?

  • Depression
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Fatigue
  • Dry, itchy skin
  • Brittle hair and nails
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Joint pain

Sardines, salmon, flax seeds and walnuts are excellent food sources of omega-3 fatty acids.

Research indicates that omega-3s may be better absorbed from food than supplements. Norwegian researchers compared 71 volunteers’ absorption of omega-3s (EPA and DHA) from salmon, smoked salmon, cod (14 ounces of fish per week) or cod liver oil (3 teaspoons per day). Cooked salmon provided 1.2 grams of omega-3s daily, while cod liver oil provided more than twice as much: 3 grams of omega-3s per day.

Despite the fact that the salmon group got less than half the amount of omega-3s as the cod liver oil group, blood levels of omega-3s increased quite a bit more in those eating salmon than those taking cod liver oil. After 8 weeks, EPA levels had risen 129% and DHA rose 45% in those eating cooked salmon compared to 106% and 25%, respectively, in those taking cod liver oil.

In the group eating smoked salmon, blood levels of omega-3s rose about one-third less than in the salmon group. In those eating cod, the rise in omega-3s was very small.

Concurrent with the rise in omega-3s in those eating salmon, a drop was seen in blood levels of a number of pro-inflammatory chemicals (TNFalpha, IL-8, leukotriene B4, and thromboxane B2). Researchers think omega-3s may be better absorbed from fish because fish contains these fats in the form of triglycerides, while the omega-3s in almost all refined fish oils are in the ethyl ester form. Once absorbed, omega-3s are converted by the body from their triglyceride to ester forms as needed. Lipids. 2006 Dec;41(12):1109-14.

 

World’s Healthiest Foods rich in
omega-3 fats
FoodCals%Daily Value
 Flax Seeds75132.9%
 Walnuts196113.3%
 Sardines18960.8%
 Salmon15855%
 Soybeans29842.9%
 Tofu16427.5%
 Shrimp13514.1%
 Brussels Sprouts5611.2%
 Cauliflower298.7%
 Winter Squash767.9%

For serving size for specific foods see the Nutrient Rating Chart.

 

Description

What are omega-3 fatty acids?

You’ve probably been hearing about omega-3 fatty acids in recent years. The reason? A growing body of scientific research indicates that these healthy fats help prevent a wide range of medical problems, including cardiovascular disease, depression, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Unlike the saturated fats found in butter and lard, omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated. In chemistry class, the terms “saturated” and “polyunsaturated” refer to the number of hydrogen atoms that are attached to the carbon chain of the fatty acid. In the kitchen, these terms take on a far more practical meaning.

Polyunsaturated fats, unlike saturated fats, are liquid at room temperature and remain liquid when refrigerated or frozen. Monounsaturated fats, found in olive oil, are liquid at room temperature, but harden when refrigerated. When eaten in appropriate amounts, each type of fat can contribute to health. However, the importance of omega-3 fatty acids in health promotion and disease prevention cannot be overstated.

The three most nutritionally important omega-3 fatty acids are alpha-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

Alpha-linolenic acid is one of two fatty acids traditionally classified as “essential.” The other fatty acid traditionally viewed as essential is an omega 6 fat called linoleic acid. These fatty acids have traditionally been classified as “essential” because the body is unable to manufacture them on its own and because they play a fundamental role in several physiological functions. As a result, we must be sure our diet contains sufficient amounts of both alpha-linolenic acid and linoleic acid.

Dietary sources of alpha-linolenic acid include flaxseeds, walnuts, hemp seeds, soybeans and some dark green leafy vegetables. Linoleic acid is found in high concentrations in corn oil, safflower oil, sunflower oil, and canola oil. Most people consume a much higher amount of linoleic acid than alpha-linolenic acid, which has important health consequences. For more information on the proper ratio of these fatty acids in the diet, see our FAQ entitled, A New Way of Looking at Proteins, Fats, and Carbohydrates

The body converts alpha-linolenic acid into two important omega-3 fats, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA). These fats can also be derived directly from certain foods, most notably cold-water fish including salmon, tuna, halibut, and herring. In addition, certain types of algae contain DHA. EPA is believed to play a role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, while DHA is the necessary for proper brain and nerve development.

How it Functions

What are the functions of omega-3 fatty acids?

Every cell in our body is surrounded by a cell membrane composed mainly of fatty acids. The cell membrane allows the proper amounts of necessary nutrients to enter the cell, and ensures that waste products are quickly removed from the cell.

Promoting Healthy Cell Membranes

To perform these functions optimally, however, the cell membrane must maintain its integrity and fluidity. Cells without a healthy membrane lose their ability to hold water and vital nutrients. They also lose their ability to communicate with other cells. Researchers believe that loss of cell to cell communication is one of the physiological events that leads to growth of cancerous tumors.

Because cell membranes are made up of fat, the integrity and fluidity of our cell membranes is determined in large part by the type of fat we eat. Remember that saturated fats are solid at room temperature, while omega-3 fats are liquid at room temperature. Researchers believe that diets containing large amounts of saturated or hydrogenated fats produce cell membranes that are hard and lack fluidity. On the other hand, diets rich in omega-3 fats produce cell membranes with a high degree of fluidity.

In addition, recent in vitro (test tube) evidence suggests when omega-3 fatty acids are incorporated into cell membranes they may help to protect against cancer, notably of the breast. They are suggested to promote breast cancer cell apoptosis via several mechanisms including: inhibiting a pro-inflammatory enzyme called cyclooxygenase 2 (COX 2), which promotes breast cancer; activating a type of receptor in cell membranes called peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), which can shut down proliferative activity in a variety of cells including breast cells; and, increasing the expression of BRCA1 and BRCA2, tumor suppressor genes that, when functioning normally, help repair damage to DNA, thus helping to prevent cancer development.

Animal and test tube studies published in the November 2005 issue of theInternational Journal of Cancer suggest yet another way in which the omega-3 fatty acids found in cold water fish—docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)—help protect against breast cancer development.

All dietary fatty acids are incorporated into cell membranes, and the type of fatty acids dictates how a cell responds and grows. Researchers found that omega-3 fatty acids affect cell growth by activating an enzyme called sphingomyelinase, which then generates the release of ceramide, a compound that induces the expression of the human tumor suppressor gene p21, which ultimately causes cancer cell death.

In the animal experiments, mice were fed diets rich in either omega-3 (fish oil) or omega-6 (corn oil) fatty acids after which breast cancer cells were implanted. Three weeks later, tumor volume and weight was significantly lower in mice on the omega-3 rich diet. In the lab culture experiments, when cells were treated with DHA or EPA, sphingomyelinase activity increased by 30-40%, and breast cancer cell growth dropped 20-25%.

Prostaglandin Production

Omega-3 fats also play an important role in the production of powerful hormone-like substances called prostaglandins. Prostaglandins help regulate many important physiological functions including blood pressure, blood clotting, nerve transmission, the inflammatory and allergic responses, the functions of the kidneys and gastrointestinal tract, and the production of other hormones.

In essence, all prostaglandins perform essential physiological functions. However, depending on the type of fat in the diet, certain types of prostaglandins may be produced in large quantities, while others may not be produced at all. This can set up an imbalance throughout the body that can lead to disease.

For example, EPA and DHA serve as direct precursors for series 3 prostaglandins, which have been called “good” or “beneficial” because they reduce platelet aggregation, reduce inflammation and improve blood flow. The role of EPA and DHA in the prevention of cardiovascular disease can be explained in large part by the ability of these fats to increase the production of favorable prostaglandins.

The omega 6 fats serve as precursors for series 1 and series 2 prostaglandins. Like the series 3 prostaglandins produced from omega-3 fats, series 1 prostaglandins are believed to be beneficial. On the other hand, series 2 prostaglandins are usually considered to be “bad” or “unhealthy,” since these prostaglandins promote an inflammatory response and increase platelet aggregation. As a result, it is important to ensure proper balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fats in the diet.

EPA Directly Anti-Inflammatory

A recently identified lipid (fat) product our bodies make from EPA, called resolvins, helps explain how this omega-3 fat provides anti-inflammatory effects on our joints and improves blood flow.

Resolvins, which have been shown to reduce inflammation in animal studies, are made from EPA by our cellular enzymes, and work by inhibiting the production and regulating the migration of inflammatory cells and chemicals to sites of inflammation. Unlike anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin, ibuprofen and the COX-2 inhibitors, the resolvins our bodies produce from EPA do not have negative side effects on our gastrointestinal or cardiovascular systems.

Deficiency Symptoms

What are deficiency symptoms for omega-3 fatty acids?

Recent statistics indicate that nearly 99% of people in the United States do not eat enough omega 3 fatty acids. However, the symptoms of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency are very vague, and can often be attributed to some other health conditions or nutrient deficiencies.

Consequently, few people (or their physicians, for that matter) realize that they are not consuming enough omega-3 fatty acids. The symptoms of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency include fatigue, dry and/or itchy skin, brittle hair and nails, constipation, frequent colds, depression, poor concentration, lack of physical endurance, and/or joint pain.

Toxicity Symptoms

What are toxicity symptoms for omega 3 fatty acids?

In its 2002 guidelines for omega-3 fatty acid intake, the Institute of Medicine at the National Academy of Sciences declined to establish a Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) for omega-3s. However, research was cited showing increased risk of bleeding and hemorrhagic stroke in a few studies following supplementation with omega-3s. Individuals who have disorders involving bleeding, who bruise very easily, or who are taking blood thinners should consult with a medical practitioner before taking supplemental omega-3 fatty acids.

Impact of Cooking, Storage and Processing

How do cooking, storage, or processing affect omega-3 fatty acids?

Polyunsaturated oils, including the omega-3 fats, are extremely susceptible to damage from heat, light, and oxygen. When exposed to these elements for too long, the fatty acids in the oil become oxidized, a scientific term that simply means that the oil becomes rancid.

Rancidity not only alters the flavor and smell of the oil, but it also diminishes the nutritional value. More importantly, the oxidation of fatty acids produces free radicals, which are believed to play a role in the development of cancer and other degenerative diseases.

Under most circumstances, the problem of rancidity only arises when the oils are removed from their natural food package. For example, the hard shell of the flaxseed protects the oil inside the seed from heat, light, and oxygen. Flaxseeds also contain antioxidant compounds, such as vitamin E, that provide additional protection against oxidation. But, when the seed is pressed to isolate the oil, the oil becomes vulnerable to the elements.

As a result, oils rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids should be stored in dark glass, tightly closed containers in the refrigerator or freezer. In addition, these oils should never be heated on the stove. So, instead of sautéing your vegetables in flaxseed or walnut oil, make a salad dressing using these oils.

Although less a problem with whole foods than processed oils, some foods containing omega-3 fatty acids appear to lose some of their health benefits (like heart protection) when the foods are fried. Fried fish is a good example in this area, since fried fish containing omega-3s have been shown to provide less heart protection than baked or broiled fish containing the same amount of omega-3s.

Factors that Affect Function

What factors might contribute to a deficiency of omega-3 fatty acids?

The conversion of alpha-linolenic acid to EPA and DHA involves a series of chemical reactions. One of the first reactions in this series is catalyzed by the enzyme delta-6 desaturase. Further down the line is a reaction that is catalyzed by the enzyme delta-5 desaturase. Unfortunately, it is now well-known that these enzymes do not function optimally in many people, and, consequently, only a small amount of the alpha-linolenic acid consumed in the diet is converted to EPA, DHA, and ultimately to the anti-inflammatory prostaglandins.

To increase the activity of your desaturase enzymes, be sure that your diet includes a sufficient amount of vitamin B6vitamin B3vitamin Cmagnesium andzinc. In addition, limit your intake of saturated fat and partially hydrogenated fat, as these fats are known to decrease the activity of delta-6 desaturase. Also, to be on the safe side, consider including a direct source of EPA and DHA if your diet, such as wild-caught salmon, halibut, or tuna.

Nutrient Interactions

How do other nutrients interact with omega-3 fatty acids?

Vitamin E, the primary fat-soluble antioxidant, protects omega-3 fats from oxidation. Oxidation is a chemical process that produces free radicals.

Health Conditions

What health conditions require special emphasis on omega-3 fatty acids?

Omega-3 fatty acids may play a role in the prevention and/or treatment of the following health conditions:

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Asthma
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Cancer
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Depression
  • Diabetes
  • Eczema
  • High blood pressure
  • Huntington’s disease
  • Lupus
  • Migraine headaches
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Obesity
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Psoriasis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis

Food Sources

What foods provide omega-3 fatty acids?

Flax seeds and walnuts are excellent sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Very good sources of these healthy fats include salmon, sardines, cloves, and grass-fed beef. Good sources of these fats include halibut, shrimp, cod, tuna, soybeans, tofu, kale, collard greens, and winter squash.

Studies have proven that a relatively small number of omega-3 food sources can have a measurable impact on your blood levels of omega-3s, including those two key omega-3 fatty acids, EPA (eicosaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). For example, two weekly servings of a non-fried, omega-3 containing fish (like wild-caught Pacific salmon) is enough to boost your blood levels of omega-3s.

Nutrient Rating Chart

Introduction to Nutrient Rating System Chart

In order to better help you identify foods that feature a high concentration of nutrients for the calories they contain, we created a Food Rating System. This system allows us to highlight the foods that are especially rich in particular nutrients. The following chart shows the World’s Healthiest Foods that are either an excellent, very good, or good source of omega-3 fats. Next to each food name, you’ll find the serving size we used to calculate the food’s nutrient composition, the calories contained in the serving, the amount of omega-3 fats contained in one serving size of the food, the percent Daily Value (DV%) that this amount represents, the nutrient density that we calculated for this food and nutrient, and the rating we established in our rating system. For most of our nutrient ratings, we adopted the government standards for food labeling that are found in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s “Reference Values for Nutrition Labeling.” Read more background information and details of our rating system.

World’s Healthiest Foods ranked as quality sources of
omega-3 fats
Food Serving
Size
Cals Amount
(g)
DV
(%)
Nutrient
Density
World’s
Healthiest
Foods Rating
Flax Seeds 2 TBS 74.8 3.19 132.92 32.0 excellent
Walnuts 0.25 cup 196.2 2.72 113.33 10.4 excellent
Sardines 3.20 oz 188.7 1.46 60.83 5.8 very good
Salmon 4 oz 157.6 1.32 55.00 6.3 very good
Brussels Sprouts 1 cup 56.2 0.27 11.25 3.6 very good
Cauliflower 1 cup 28.5 0.21 8.75 5.5 very good
Mustard Seeds 2 tsp 20.3 0.15 6.25 5.5 very good
Soybeans 1 cup 297.6 1.03 42.92 2.6 good
Tofu 4 oz 164.4 0.66 27.50 3.0 good
Shrimp 4 oz 134.9 0.34 14.17 1.9 good
Winter Squash 1 cup 75.8 0.19 7.92 1.9 good
Broccoli 1 cup 54.6 0.19 7.92 2.6 good
Cod 4 oz 96.4 0.19 7.92 1.5 good
Collard Greens 1 cup 62.7 0.18 7.50 2.2 good
Spinach 1 cup 41.4 0.17 7.08 3.1 good
Summer Squash 1 cup 36.0 0.15 6.25 3.1 good
Raspberries 1 cup 64.0 0.15 6.25 1.8 good
Kale 1 cup 36.4 0.13 5.42 2.7 good
Green Beans 1 cup 43.8 0.11 4.58 1.9 good
Romaine Lettuce 2 cups 16.0 0.11 4.58 5.2 good
Strawberries 1 cup 46.1 0.09 3.75 1.5 good
Turnip Greens 1 cup 28.8 0.09 3.75 2.3 good
Miso 1 TBS 34.2 0.08 3.33 1.8 good
Basil 0.50 cup 4.9 0.07 2.92 10.8 good
Leeks 1 cup 32.2 0.07 2.92 1.6 good
World’s Healthiest
Foods Rating
Rule
excellent DV>=75% OR
Density>=7.6 AND DV>=10%
very good DV>=50% OR
Density>=3.4 AND DV>=5%
good DV>=25% OR
Density>=1.5 AND DV>=2.5%

Public Health Recommendations

What are current public health recommendations for omega-3 fatty acids?

In 2002, the Institute of Medicine at the National Academy of Sciences issued Adequate Intake (AI) levels for linolenic acid, the initial building block for all omega-3 fatty acids found in the body. For male teenagers and adult men, 1.6 grams per day were recommended, For female teenagers and adult women, the recommended amount was 1.1 grams per day. These guidelines do not seem as well-matched to the existing health research on omega-3 fatty acids as guidelines issued by the Workshop on the Essentiality of and Recommended Dietary Intakes (RDI) for Omega-6 and Omega-3 Fatty Acids in 1999 sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This panel of experts recommended that people consume at least 2% of their total daily calories as omega-3 fats. To meet this recommendation, a person consuming 2000 calories per day should eat sufficient omega-3-rich foods to provide at least 4 grams of omega-3 fatty acids.

This goal can be easily met by adding just two foods to your diet: flaxseeds and wild-caught salmon. Two tablespoons of flaxseeds contain 3.5 grams of omega-3 fats, while a 4 ounce piece of salmon contains 1.5 grams of omega 3 fats. There’s research evidence showing that two servings of non-fried fish per week—especially salmon, tuna, and halibut—can be enough to significantly increase the level of omega-3 fatty acids in your blood (including the level of both EPA and DHA).

Vegans and vegetarians relying on ALA as their only source of omega-3 fatty acids should increase their consumption of ALA-rich foods accordingly to ensure sufficient production its important derivatives, EPA and DHA.

References

  • Arita M, Bianchini F, Aliberti J, Sher A, Chiang N, Hong S, Yang R, Petasis NA, Serhan CN. Stereochemical assignment, antiinflammatory properties, and receptor for the omega-3 lipid mediator resolvin E1. J Exp Med. 2005 Mar 7;201(5):713-22. 2005. PMID:15753205.
  • Bernard-Gallon DJ, Vissac-Sabatier C, Antoine-Vincent D et al. Differential effects of n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids on BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene expression in breast cell lines. Br J Nutr 2002 Apr;87(4):281-9. 2002.
  • Chung H, Nettleton JA, Lemaitre RN et al. Frequency and Type of Seafood Consumed Influence Plasma (n-3) Fatty Acid Concentrations. The Journal of Nutrition. Bethesda: Dec 2008. Vol. 138, Iss. 12; p. 2422-2427. 2008.
  • Elvevoll EO, Barstad H, Breimo ES, Brox J, Eilertsen KE, Lund T, Olsen JO, Osterud B. Enhanced incorporation of n-3 fatty acids from fish compared with fish oils. Lipids. 2006 Dec;41(12):1109-14. 2006. PMID:17269556.
  • Erkkila A, Lichtenstein A, Mozaffarian D, Herrington D. Fish intake is associated with a reduced progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women with coronary artery disease. Am J Clin Nutr , Sept. 2004; (80(3):626-32. 2004. PMID:15321802.
  • Fickova M, Hubert P, Cremel G, Leray C. Dietary (n-3) and (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids rapidly modify fatty acid composition and insulin effects in rat adipocytes. J Nutr 1998 Mar;128(3):512-9. 1998. PMID:8980.
  • Groff JL, Gropper SS, Hunt SM. Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism. West Publishing Company, New York, 1995. 1995.
  • Heller A, Koch T. [Immunonutrition with omega-3-fatty acids. Are new anti-inflammatory strategies in sight?]. Zentralbl Chir 2000;125(2):123-36. 2000. PMID:15830.
  • Lawson LD, Hughes BG. Absorption of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid from fish oil triacylglycerols or fish oil ethyl esters co-ingested with a high-fat meal. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1988 Oct 31;156(2):960-3. 1988. PMID:2847723.
  • Lininger SW, et al. A-Z guide to drug-herb-vitamin interactions. Prima Health, Rocklin, CA, 2000. 2000.
  • Mahan K, Escott-Stump S. Krause’s Food, Nutrition, and Diet Therapy. WB Saunders Company; Philadelphia, 1996. 1996.
  • Maillard V, Bougnoux P, Ferrari P et al. N-3 and N-6 fatty acids in breast adipose tissue and relative risk of breast cancer in a case-control study in Tours, France. Int J Cancer 2002 Mar 1;98(1):78-83. 2002.
  • Matute P. Consumption of fish to allay obesity. Paper presented at the 6th Congress of the International Society for the Study of Fatty Acids and Lipids, Brighton, Great Britain, December 12, 2004. 2004.
  • Meng L, Wilkens L, and Kolonel L. How fish is cooked affects heart-health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids. American Heart Association�s Scientific Sessions 2009. Abstract 1404/Poster 2071. Orlando, FL. 2009.
  • Osmundsen H, Clouet P. Metabolic effects of omega-3 fatty acids. Biofactors 2000;13(1-4):5-8. 2000. PMID:15800.
  • Popp-Snijders C, Schouten JA, Heine RJ, et al. Dietary supplementation of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids improves insulin sensitivity in non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Diabetes Res 1987 Mar;4(3):141-7. 1987. PMID:8990.
  • Serhan CN, Hong S, Gronert K, Colgan SP, Devchand PR, Mirick G, Moussignac RL. Resolvins: a family of boactive products of omega-3 fatty acid transformation circuits initiated by aspirin treatment that counter proinflammation signals. J Exp Med. 2002 Oct 21;196(8):1025-37. 2002. PMID:12391014.
  • Severus WE, Littman AB, Stoll AL. Omega-3 fatty acids, homocysteine, and the increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in major depressive disorder. Harv Rev Psychiatry 2001 Nov-2001 Dec 31;9(6):280-93. 2001. PMID:15780.
  • Stoll BA. n-3 fatty acids and lipid peroxidation in breast cancer inhibition. Br J Nutr 2002 March;87(3):193-8. 2002.
  • Stoll BA. Essential fatty acids, insulin resistance, and breast cancer risk. Nutr Cancer. 1998;31(1):72-77. 1998.
  • Vaddadi KS, Soosai E, Chiu E et al. A randomised, placebo-controlled, double blind study of treatment of Huntington’s disease with unsaturated fatty acids. Neuroreport 2002;13:29-33. 2002.
  • Watkins BA, Li Y, Lippman HE, Seifert MF. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and skeletal health. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 2001 Jun;226(6):485-97. 2001. PMID:15790.
  • Watkins BA, Li Y, Seifert MF. Nutraceutical fatty acids as biochemical and molecular modulators of skeletal biology. Am J Clin Nutr 2001;20(5):410S-420S. 2001.
  • Wu M, Harvey KA, Ruzmetov N, Welch ZR, Sech L, Jackson K, Stillwell W, Zaloga GP, Siddiqui RA. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids attenuate breast cancer growth through activation of a neutral sphingomyelinase-mediated pathway. Int J Cancer. 2005 Nov 10;117(3):340-8. 2005. PMID:15900589.

Omega 3’s and Tumors

I do not take a fish oil supplement because I try to get my Omega 3’s from natural sources such as salmon and chai/flax seeds. This is a interesting article about tumor growth in correlation with Omega 3 intake.  This day and age we need EVERYTHING possible to prevent cancer.  Generally, we try to eat salmon about once a week.

NaturalNews) Mainstream media sources continue to trumpet headlines about the decline in cancer rates leading many to believe that modern medicine has conquered this devastating disease through a systematic regimen of slashing, burning and poisoning. Yet nearly 1.7 million people will be diagnosed with some form of cancer this year and more than 550,000 will die from the number two killer of men, women and children. These statistics should not be surprising as millions of unsuspecting individuals continue to avoid lifestyle modifications that have been shown to dramatically lower the risk of cancer.

Many people would be amazed to know that there are a host of natural nutrients that have been scientifically validated to prevent, treat and halt the metastatic spread of some of the most invasive cancer lines. Researchers from the University of California Davis Health System have found that a product resulting from a metabolized omega-3 fatty acid helps combat cancer by cutting off the supply of oxygen and nutrients that fuel tumor growth and spread of the disease. They have published their findings in the prestigious journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Omega-3 DHA metabolite stops cancerous metastasis by halting blood supply to tumors

The bioactive long-chain omega-3 fat, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), found in its free form in fatty fish and fish oil supplements, is broken down by the body into a metabolite form known as epoxy docosapentaenoic acid (EDP). Scientists know that tumor growth is promoted by the process of blood vessel formation called angiogenesis, and determined that by inhibiting this growth pattern, EDP reduces the growth and metastatic spread of tumors in a mouse model. This research provides the first scientific evidence about EDP’s potent anti-cancer and anti-metastatic effects.

Lead study author, Dr. Guodong Zhang commented “Our investigation opens up a new understanding of the pathways by which omega-3 fatty acids exert their biologic effects… as far as we know, EDPs are the first signaling lipids that have been discovered to have such potent anti-cancer effects.” Researchers found that as EDPs are broken down through normal body enzymatic metabolism, the metabolites of these lipids can act to suppress the growth of new blood vessels that are necessary to feed tumor growth.

The researchers also found that an imbalance of omega-6 fats to omega-3 fats that occurs in a diet high in sunflower and corn oils produces a metabolite known as arachidonic acid (ARA) that has the opposite effect of EDP. ARA increases angiogenesis and tumor progression and is a primary dietary cause of cancer development and metastasis. The study team concluded “Our results designate EDP as a unique mediator of an angiogenic switch to regulate tumorigenesis.” Additionally the scientists have established a firm link between omega-6 and omega-3 fat ratios in the development of cancer. Nutrition experts recommend 1,200 to 2,400 mg of EPA/DHA from a distilled fish oil supplement to lower the risk from cardiovascular disease and cancer progression.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/publish/news/newsroom/7671

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/258560.php

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130402143944.htm

Basil works as an anti-aging food

(NaturalNews) Basil is an aromatic plant that has been utilized for a very long time as a culinary herb in order to add a much appreciated fragrance to a wide variety of dishes. It has earned its credentials in many cuisines from the regular use of pesto, a mixture of basil, pine nuts and Parmesan cheese.

Basil, scientifically called ocimum basilicim, originates from the warmer climates of Asia’s tropical regions. It’s an incredible source of antioxidants and filled with nutrients. Basil presents a wide array of health benefits. It is recognized for its exceptional anti-bacterial, antimicrobial and anti-aging properties, amongst many others. Basil also helps fight critical medical conditions such as type 2 diabetes by controlling blood sugar levels, or even cancer thanks to the active phenolics present in the herb.

Phenolics are a group of organic compounds primarily found in fruits and vegetables. The main phenolics present in basil are the flavanoids, more specifically vicenin, orientin, eugenol and anthocyanins. These all play an important role because of their strong antioxidant properties. Although there is still an ongoing debate among them, most scientists do believe that antioxidants are vital in regards to an herb’s outstanding ability to prevent cancer.

Can basil help you retain your youth?

Basil has been utilized in Ayurvedic medicines for hundreds of years if not more, therefore its healthy effects have also been studied a long time. It’s no surprise that a more recent research conducted at the Poona College of Pharmacy in Maharashtra, India, came to the conclusion that basil does protect the body from premature aging.

Researchers discovered or rather validated that basil was effective in protecting the body against free radicals. Basil’s flavanoids inhibited free radicals from causing significant damage to the body. Dr. Shinde stated the study clearly showed the herb promotes youth and it acts at a cellular level. She believes results validate its traditional use in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. She’s far from the only one as many experts now also feel that basil is an anti-aging superfood.

The anti-bacterial properties of basil are also well referenced, but this time because of its volatile oils instead of its flavanoids. A study published in the July 2003 issue of the Journal of Microbiology Methods revealed that basil’s essential oils were able to stop in its tracks strains of bacteria known as Staphylococcus, Enterococcus and Pseudomonas. These pathogenic types of bacteria have not only become widespread, but also presented a health risk from being resistant to treatment with the generally used antibiotic drugs.

Last but not least, a few studies published in the February 2004 journal of Food Microbiology, presented evidence that washing food in a solution containing as low as 1 percent of basil in it, resulted in diminishing the number of Shigella cases, which is an infectious bacteria causing diarrhea with the potential to cause more serious damage in the intestinal tract.

Sources for this article include:

http://srirad0675.hubpages.com/hub/Health-benefits-of-basil

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=85

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/healthy-basil

http://www.naturalnews.com/034870_Holy_Basil_tulsi_antioxidants.html