Red meat and Diabetes

(NaturalNews) Diabetes is a metabolic disease characterized by high levels of glucose in the blood caused by a resistance to the effects of insulin to usher sugar into cells and muscles to be used as fuel. As such, diabetes is commonly believed to be caused by excess consumption of sugary foods and processed, fast-releasing carbohydrates that continually raise blood glucose levels until our reaction to insulin released by the pancreas becomes increasingly ineffective.

The latest research indicates that while dietary sugars do play a role in diabetes progression, there is another less obvious food source that dramatically increases the risk of developing this often silent killer disease. A research team from the University of Singapore reports their findings in the JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) that demonstrates a strong correlation between red and processed meat consumption and the risk of developing type II diabetes (T2DM).

Red and processed meats promote metabolic dysfunction leading to increased diabetes risk

Prior studies have shown a causal relationship between red meat consumption and the risk of developing diabetes, but this study is the first to track changes in red and processed meat consumption and the risk of developing diabetes by studying more than 150,000 men and women over a twenty year time frame. The study tracked diet and dietary changes, including meat consumption, through a detailed questionnaire administered every four years. It also accounted for lifestyle factors such as activity level, smoking, and body weight.

Over the follow-up period that covered more than 1.9 million person years across the entire cohort, 7,450 new cases of diabetes were diagnosed. The researchers found that when compared to those with no change in how much meat they consumed, participants whose meat consumption rose by more than one-half serving per day had a 48 percent higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes during the subsequent four years. Those whose meat intake decreased by more than one-half daily serving had a 14% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes during the whole follow-up period.

The study authors concluded of their observational study, “Our results confirm the robustness of the association between red meat and T2DM and add further evidence that limiting red meat consumption over time confers benefits for T2DM prevention.” Volumes of scientific evidence currently exist that clearly implicates red and processed meats with significant increased risk of developing many types of digestive-related cancers. Risk of developing diabetes and the myriad of life-threatening complications can now be added the list, providing yet another reason to cut or totally eliminate red meat consumption.

Sources for this article include:
http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1697785
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-06/tjnj-emr061313.php
http://communities.washingtontimes.com
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/262059.php

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