Raspberry Pineapple Smoothie

Base:

1/2 cup coconut water kefir

  •     1/2 cup aloe juice
  •      1 Cup water
  •      1 Tbl of each: chia seeds, flax seed and nutritional yeast
  •      2-3 handfuls of Kale
  •      1 banana

Flavor:

  •       1/3 of a lime with skin
  •       1 cup frozen raspberry’s
  •       1 cup frozen chunk pineapple

Blend until smooth.  Serves 2

Raspberry Benefits:

Antioxidants are believed to have substantial health benefits and raspberries in particular are a good source. In fact, raspberries may have 10 times more antioxidants than tomatoes or broccoli. Further, raspberries contain some specific antioxidants that are found almost nowhere else.

In a study published in a recent issue of BioFactors, researchers from Plant Research International, Wageningen, The Netherlands, discuss specific compounds found in the berry, some appropriate methods for assaying the antioxidant concentration, and the biochemistry of antioxidant uptake in humans.

“Raspberries contain vitamin C and anthocanines,” says Jules Beekwilder, “but these can also be found in other products. However, approximately 50% of the antioxidant effect of raspberries is caused by ellagitannins. These you find in small doses in strawberries and practically nowhere else.” Some Chinese herbs may also be a source of these compounds.

 http://www.naturalnews.com/019978_raspberries_antioxidant_antioxidants.html#ixzz32SxTC7HV

Raspberries have significantly high levels of phenolic flavonoid phytochemicals such as anthocyanins, ellagic acid (tannin), quercetin, gallic acid, cyanidins, pelargonidins, catechins, kaempferol and salicylic acid. Scientific studies show that these antioxidant compounds in these berries have potential health benefits against cancer, aging, inflammation, and neuro-degenerative diseases.

  • Fresh raspberries are an excellent source of vitamin-C, which is also a powerful natural antioxidant. 100 g berries provide 26.2 mg or about 47% of DRI of vitamin C. Consumption of fruits rich in vitamin C helps the body develop resistance against infectious agents, counter inflammation, and scavenge harmful free radicals.
  • Raspberry contains anti-oxidant vitamins like vitamin A, and vitamin E. In addition to the above-mentioned antioxidants, is also rich in several other health promoting flavonoid poly phenolic antioxidants such aslutein, zea-xanthin, and β-carotene in small amounts. Altogether, these compounds help act as protective scavengers against oxygen-derived free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a role in aging and various disease processes.
  • Raspberry has an ORAC value (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) of about 4900 per 100 grams, crediting it among the top-ranked ORAC fruits.
  • Raspberries contain a good amount of minerals like potassium, manganese, copper, iron and magnesium. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese is used by the body as a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Copper is required in the production of red blood cells.
  • They are rich in B-complex group of vitamins and vitamin K. The berries contain very good amounts of vitamin B-6, niacin, riboflavin, and folic acid. These vitamins are function as co-factors and help body in the metabolism of carbohydrates, protein and fats.

http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/raspberry.html

Cancer Fighter:

  • Research confirms that red foods such as strawberries, tomatoes, raspberries, tart cherries, cranberries, and goji berries are high in immunosupportive and cancer-fighting nutrients such as lycopene and carotene.[15][16][17]Many red foods also have high antioxidant content, making them an integral component of any anticancer diet. The antioxidant power of raspberries, strawberries, pomegranate, and dozens of other nutrient-rich fruits make some red and berry powders cancer superfoods.

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/preventing-and-reversing-cancer-naturally-anticancer-diet-shopping-list

Fiber:

  • 100 g berries contain just 52 calories but provide 6.5 g of fiber (16% of daily recommended intake)

http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/raspberry.html

Antioxident:

  • The diversity of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory phytonutrients in raspberries is truly remarkable, and few commonly eaten fruits are able to provide us with greater diversity.

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=39

Obesity:

  • One of the most fascinating new areas of raspberry research involves the potential for raspberries to improve management of obesity. Although this research is in its early stages, scientists now know that metabolism in our fat cells can be increased by phytonutrients found in raspberries, especially rheosmin (also called raspberry ketone). By increasing enzyme activity, oxygen consumption, and heat production in certain types of fat cells, raspberry phytonutrients like rheosmin may be able to decrease risk of obesity as well as risk of fatty liver. In addition to these benefits, rheosmin can decrease activity of a fat-digesting enzyme released by our pancreas called pancreatic lipase. This decrease in enzyme activity may result in less digestion and absorption of fat.
  • http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=39

Glucose control

  •    We’ve seen estimates for many berries that fall into the 40-50 GI range, and for most researchers, that would place them in the low GI category. Since one cup of fresh raspberries provides about 15 grams of total carbohydrates and only 5-6 grams of sugar (compared with 8 grams of dietary fiber), a modest serving of fresh raspberries (for example, 1/2 cup) is likely to be a very good fit in most diets, even diets focused on stabilization of blood sugar.

 http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=39

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