Cauliflower Rice

  • a small head of organic cauliflower, chopped coarsely
  • 1 small onion, chopped finely in a food processor
  • 1-2 tablespoons of coconut oil
  • chili seasoning
  • Trader Joe’s 21 seasoning salute (or seasonings of choice)
  •  pepper

Adapted from: Nom Nom Paleo

 

I pulsed the cauliflower until they were reduced to the size of couscous or rice grains.

Then, I sauteed the onions  coconut oil over medium heat until they were translucent.  

When the onions were softened, I dumped in the cauliflower and stirred everything around to evenly distribute the  onions.  

Season the rice to your liking.

Then, I covered the skillet and cooked the cauliflower for 5-10 minutes until softened.  (Omit this step if using in stuffed peppers because you will saute them a little with that).

You can totally change up the seasoning and customize it to your tastes.  A head of cauliflower makes a lot of rice (~ 6 servings) so I have a base for a bunch of packed lunches.  Yay!

Squash stuffed Peppers

Makes 3 servings

  • 3 bell peppers, cut in half length-wise, insides removed (colors of choice)
  • Cauliflower rice
  • 1.5 cups water
  • ½ large yellow onion, finely chopped (about 2.5 cups chopped onion)
  • 1 small-medium butternut squash, peeled and chopped into cubes
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable broth
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons coriander
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 cup baby spinach, roughly chopped

Adapted from: The Roasted Root

  1. Prepare Cauliflower rice
  2. Bake Butternut squash until done ( 400 degree for 30-45 minutes)
  3. Saute the yellow onion with vegetable broth. Then add cumin, coriander, garlic powder. Stir and sauté  then add butternut squash for a few minutes to mix with seasonings.
  4. When rice is finished ,add the rice and the chopped spinach to the skillet with the butternut squash, mix all together and set aside.
  5. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  6. Cut the bell peppers length-wise, remove their insides and place cut-side down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake in the oven for 5 minutes.
  7. Remove peppers from the oven, flip them over (cut-side up) and stuff them with the stuffing, loading them up to the max (you may have a little leftover butternut squash stuffing).
  8. Bake the stuffed peppers for 7 minutes then remove and serve with your favorite meal!

A few of the benefits of juice plus

 

 

J plus info slide

 

 

This is honestly my lifeline.  I do not believe in taking supplements but I did my research on this and it pans out to be the best way to bridge the gap:

1.between not eating enough fruits and vegetables (10-15 servings a day)

2. old and less nutritious foods

3. lack of variety and array of foods

 

If you want more information please let me know.

CHICKPEA DUMPLINGS IN CURRY TOMATO SAUCE

adapted from Saveur Issue 156
  • 1 cup chickpea flour (also called Garbanzo bean flour)
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped cilantro (plus more for garnish)
  • 1/8 cup Tablespoon peanut oil
  • 1/8 cup of water
  • 1/3 cup coconut yogurt plain
  • 2 serrano chilis, minced (remove seeds if you do not want a little spice)
  • 1 onion, minced
  • 1 teaspoons coriander seeds
  • 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons curry powder
  •  28 ounce whole tomatoes, crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger (or 1 inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled & grated)
  • Cooked quinoa

Heat 1/2 Tablespoon of oil in a large skillet or saucepan over medium. Add coriander, mustard, and cumin seeds; cook for about a minute or until they begin to pop. Add curry powder, one serrano pepper, and 1/2 the onion. Sauté for about 5 minutes or until softened. Add tomatoes (with juice ), turmeric, ginger, and a cup of water. Bring to a boil and then let simmer for ten minutes or until it has thickened up.

While simmering, combine the rest of the serranos, onions, chickpea flour, cilantro, oil, yogurt, in a bowl. Stir until a thick dough has formed.

Drop a heaping tablespoon of dough into the stew; repeat with the rest of the dough. Cover mixture and let steam / simmer for another 5-7 minutes. Remove from heat and serve over a little quinoa. Garnish with cilantro if desired.

 

Adapted from http://www.vegetarianventures.com/2013/09/22/chickpea-dumplings-in-curry-tomato-sauce/#.UopHcdI3uCl

Sugar types

So from my previous post I began looking into sugar types and the recommended substitutes.  There is allot of conflicting information but I know fore sure we just need to LIMIT our sugar intake as much as possible. Please read and then do your own research as who knows how accurate sites and information can be.  I am now looking into date, beet and coconut sugars (coconut palm) to compare to stevia and xylitol.  Please see the attached information with a general overview of the types of sugar.

I am not going to be using honey to bake with anymore as I have realized it looses all nutritional properties and also has a high glycemic index. I do however believe a little local (within a 5 mile radius) honey in smoothies or on toast in small quantities have helped my ragweed allergies.  Also, why else would God have created bee’s to produce honey??

I have underlined key things from the sugars I am trying to decide between.  I would prefer from a natural source and the least processed.

 

Recommended Maximum Dose: The World Health Organization recommends that we limit our intake of added sugars to no more than 10% of total calories. That comes to about 50 grams of sugar, or the equivalent of 4 tablespoons of granulated sugar for a person eating 2000 calories a day. One tablespoon of granulated sugar is equal to about 12 grams. The American Heart Association would like to see this figure at 5% — no more than 100 calories a day from added sugar for most women, and no more than 150 calories a day for most men. That’s about 2 tablespoons of added sugar for women and 3 for men.

The research* shows that sugary liquids in quantity, in a short period of time, are poison to the body. Drinking sugar forces your liver to convert the fructose to dangerous fats. And drinking just one can of soda is all you need to get your daily maximum requirement of sugar! So — soda and sweetened (and un-sweetened!) fruit juices are now considered the new poisons. (See chart below) If you are going to imbibe, it is much better to eat your sugar, versus drinking it. In vegetables and fruits, the sugars are mixed in with fiber, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and beneficial phytonutrients, all which moderate any negative metabolic effects.

Table sugar is about 50% fructose, 50% glucose. These two simple sugars glucose and fructose are processed by our bodies differently. Glucose is metabolized by just about every cell of our body. Fructose is metabolized by the liver. So, consuming fructose is a lot more work for your liver than consuming starch (glucose). Plus, fructose metabolism is about twice as fast as glucose metabolism, thereby hitting your system faster and more furiously. And, what is hitting your system is triglycerides (fat in your blood), free fatty acids and LDL (bad) cholesterol. And unlike glucose, fructose does not cause the release of insulin from the pancreas, so it has no regulator. After eating 120 calories of glucose, one calorie is stored as fat. After 120 calories of fructose, 40 calories are stored as fat.(Link) Simply put liquid fructose = fat. Fructose (outside of whole fruits and vegetables) is bad! Watch the video ‘Sugar: The Bitter Truth‘ below.

People who overindulge in sugar have fatty livers, high blood triglyceride levels, elevated LDL (bad) cholesterol, high uric acid levels, may develop insulin resistance and a state of chronic inflammation and have a greater risk of heart attack, kidney stones, high blood pressure, low bone mineral density and cancer. Not to mention dental cavities and depletion of vitamins and minerals. Our body’s need (but can also manufacture) glucose, but they do not ‘need’ fructose.

So, how are we supposed to make the occasional pie or cake without feeling like we are poisoning our family? First the candidates:
Ends in “ose” = a sugar.
Ends in “itol” = a sugar alcohol
Disaccharide = two sugars joined together

     Agave: The highly processed pulp of a desert-dwelling succulent plant. Agave is high in fructose, different brands range from 56-92% fructose. It is about 33 percent sweeter than sugar. Very high fructose – steer clear.

 Aspartame: Sold under the names Equal, NutraSweet, AminoSweet. 100% artificial chemicals = poison! Artificial sweeteners = artificial reactions. Aspartame is now the most used artificial sweetener in the world. A University of Liverpool study showed that aspartame could be toxic to brain cells when mixed with yellow food coloring. Researchers have found that one harmful breakdown product of aspartame is formaldehyde.*

Do not use aspartam- please stay far far away from it.

Barley Malt Syrup: Sprouted barley grains are dried quickly. Then the dried sprouts are slowly cooked so that they form a syrup. Digested slowly. About half as sweet as sugar. A molasses flavor.

  Beet Sugar: Is derived from the refining of sugar beets. It is processed into sucrose. Beware of GM sugar beets.

Brown Sugar: Refined white sugar with a bit of molasses added back into it.

Cane Juice and Cane Syrup: Produced from squeezed sugar cane juice. It’s less refined and so has a bit more color and flavor from the sugar cane.

Coconut Palm: Unrefined, organic best. Although imported, it is sustainable because coconut palms grow in bio-diverse ecosystems, rather than huge mono-crop farms like sugar cane. 15 calories per teaspoon. Low glycemic level of 35. Lots of micro-nutrients.

Confectioners’ Sugar: Granulated white sugar ground into a fine powder, sometimes with a bit of cornstarch.

Corn Sweeteners and Corn Syrup: Made by milling corn to produce corn starch, then processing with enzymes and acids to yield corn syrup. May contain between 20% and 98% glucose. Also called “glucose syrup.” Still highly processed. HFCS is below.

Date Sugar: Derived from dates. Lots of fructose. **I do not like the high fructose in this.

Demerara: Comes from pressed sugar cane that’s steamed. The water is evaporated out, leaving large and coarse crystals.
Dextrose: Another name for glucose.

Erythritol: A ployol (sugar alcohol) resembles sugar in consistency and taste but has a caloric value near zero. Since the human body does not have any enzymes that can break down erythritol, it is not metabolized and is excreted unchanged in the urine. See more below under sugar alcohols. (Organic Zero a brand name)

Fructose: Fruit sugar that occurs naturally in honey, dates, raisins, grapes, apples, etc.. Now, most often fructose is produced from corn syrup. Fructose is 50% sweeter then cane or beet sugar. Fructose is metabolized by the liver. If liquid fructose is ingested quickly and in quantity the liver becomes stressed and therefore turns most all the fructose to fat. Fructose tends to promote an increase in triglycerides in the blood, which increases the risk of heart disease. Fructose also increases levels of uric acid in the body. Excess fructose causes a number of serious health issues. Dr. Robert Lustig calls fructose ‘evil’!

Fruit Juice Concentrate: Syrups made by heating fruit juices to remove their water, then treating with enzymes and filtering, then re-adding fruit flavors. Lots of fructose!

Glucose: Also known as dextrose. A simple sugar that is metabolized by most every cell in the body. Also called blood sugar because it circulates in your blood. It fuels your cells. The body keeps blood glucose in a set range, through careful administration of insulin. The pancreas makes insulin. Our cells cannot use glucose without the help of insulin. Most all carbohydrates contain glucose, either alone, as in starch and glycogen, or together with another monosaccharide, as in sucrose and lactose. Glucose is 20% less sweet than sugar.
Glucose Syrup: Any liquid starch consisting of carbohydrates. Also called corn syrup when its main ingredient is cornstarch. Can be made from any source of starch; corn, wheat, rice and potatoes are the most common sources. The main benefit of this syrup over regular granulated sugar is its non-crystallizing properties.

Granulated White Sugar: Also known as table sugar, or pure crystallized sucrose, made by processing raw sugar from sugar cane or sugar beets.

High Fructose Corn Syrup: Also called glucose-fructose syrup. A combination of fructose and glucose made by processing corn syrup. Enzymatic processing converts some of the corn syrup’s glucose into fructose to produce a desired sweetness. The resulting syrup is sweeter and more soluble. HFCS 55 (mostly used in soft drinks) is approximately 55% fructose and 42% glucose. A recent University of Southern California analysis of popular sodas (all sweetened with HFCS) found that the percent of fructose can be as high as 65 percent.(Link) As much as 60% of the sugar consumed in the US is actually HFCS. A very controversial product. More than one study has detected unsafe mercury levels in HFCS. In a Princeton study rats given HFCS gained 48% of their body weight in fat, a much greater weight gain than rats fed sugar. This is the equivalent of a 200 pound person gaining 96 pounds.(Link)
High Maltose Corn Syrup: A highly processed corn syrup with a high maltose content. Maltose is two bonded units of glucose. No fructose is present at all, and it is very easy for the body to break down. Our bodies create an enzyme, maltase that easily breaks down maltose into glucose. (Link)
Honey: A mix of glucose, fructose and sucrose created from nectar made by bees. Honey typically has a fructose/glucose ratio similar to HFCS 55, as well as containing some sucrose and other sugars.

Invert Sugar: Used as a food additive to preserve freshness and create smoothness, this is sucrose broken down into its respective parts – fructose and glucose.

Jaggery: Is unrefined sugarcane or palm sap heated to 200 °C. It comes in blocks, bricks, cups or pastes. It contains up to 50% sucrose, up to 20% invert sugars, up to 20% moisture, and the remainder is made up of other insoluble matter such as wood ash, proteins and fibers. It is called Palm Sugar when made from the date palm or sugar date palm. Known by many names throughout the world such as tapa dulce and rapadura.

Lactose: Sugar that occurs naturally in milk. Derived from whey. Lactose is about 20% as sweet as sugar.

Maltodextrin: A highly processed powdered sweetener enzymatically derived from any starch, resulting in a mixture of Glucose, Maltose, Oligosaccharides and Polysaccharides. In the US, the starch is usually corn, rice or potato; in Europe, it is commonly wheat. Maltodextrin is easily digestible, being absorbed as rapidly as glucose, and might be either moderately sweet or almost flavorless. A good thickener.

Maltose: (aka Malt Sugar) Starch and malt broken down (mashed) into simple sugars and used commonly in beer, bread and baby food. Produced when amylase breaks down the starch of germinated seeds, such as barley. Maltose is a disaccharide where fructose is a monosaccharide. Maltose is one third as sweet as sucrose.

 

     Maple Syrup: Boiled down maple tree sap. Barely processed, pure maple syrup is a good source of minerals like manganese and zinc. Keep your mind open to Grade B which could contain even more minerals than A. 17 calories per teaspoon.

     Molasses: The thick, dark syrup that’s leftover when sugar beets or sugar cane are processed into granulated sugar. Black strap is loaded with vitamins, minerals and trace elements naturally present in the sugar cane plant and is a good source of iron, vitamin B6, potassium, calcium and magnesium.

     Muscovado: Unrefined. Made by pressing sugarcane and then cooking it slightly before allowing it to dry. Full of molasses and minerals. A good substitute for brown sugar, tends to be sticky. Store in tightly sealed jar.

     Rice Syrup (Brown Rice Syrup): Derived by cooking down rice or rice flour with enzymes (usually from dried barley sprouts) to break down starches. The final product is 45% maltose, 3% glucose, and 52% maltotriose. The syrup breaks down rather slowly, providing more of a time-release energy flow than sugar. About 13 calories per teaspoon and is less sweet than sugar. Tastes like butterscotch or caramel.

     Saccharin: aka Sweet’n Low. Artificial sweeteners = artificial reactions.

     Sorbitol: Also known as glucitol, a sugar alcohol. See below…

     Stevia Rebaudiana: Also known as sweet leaf, sugarleaf. Stevia plants are dried and subjected to a water extraction process. 300 times sweeter than sugar with zero calories. Too good to be true – yes, a bitter aftertaste. Caution as to the brand Truvia – it contains a chemically modified stevia.

     Sucanat: (Brand, Sugar Cane Natural) Made by crushing sugar cane, extracting the juice and heating. Sucanat still contains the cane’s natural molasses, it has a deep brown color and a molasses flavor. It can be substituted for brown sugar in any recipe.

     Sucralose: (aka Splenda, SucraPlus, Candys, Cukren, E955 and Nevella) An artificial sweetener. 600 times as sweet as table sugar, twice as sweet as saccharin, and 3.3 times as sweet as aspartame. Lots of steps of chlorination in its processing.

     Sucrose: The chemical name for granulated white table sugar which can be produced from either sugar cane or sugar beets. It is broken down during digestion into a mixture of 50% fructose and 50% glucose. Each molecule of sucrose eaten means a molecule of glucose goes straight to the blood and one of fructose goes straight to the liver. Sulfur dioxide is added before evaporation to bleach the sugar.

     Sugar Alcohols: Also know as polyols, derived from a plant sugar which is extracted by differing means, then reduced and then hydrogenated, then recrystallized. Part of their structure resembles sugar and part is similar to alcohol, yet they are neither sugar nor alcohol, they just resemble their molecular structure. Contain about 2.6 calories per gram. Occur naturally in plant products such as fruits, berries, starches, seaweeds.

Products which use sugar alcohols can be called “sugar free”
Each sugar alcohol acts differently in the body.
Forms of sugar alcohol:

Erythritol: Glucose is liquefied then fermented with a yeast, then crystallized. Erythritol is absorbed into the blood stream via the small intestine and then excreted unchanged in the urine. Erythritol has very small molecules and so passes directly through the system without metabolizing. Since it never makes it to the large intestine, this sugar alcohol does not cause the bloating and gas that are often associated with other sugar alcohols. 70% as sweet as sucrose. Heat-stable. People mix it with Stevia. (Organic Zero is a brand name)

     Hydrogenated starch hydrolysates: HSH is made from starches (wheat, corn, potato) and then by using hydrolysis, dextrin is created. Hydrogenation then coverts the dextrins into sugar alcohols. 40 – 90 percent of the sweetness of sugar. HSH do not crystallize and are used in confections, baked goods and mouthwashes. Adds texture and increases viscosity.

Isomalt: Is made from sucrose. It is a mixture of gluco-mannitol and gluco-sorbitol. Isomalt is only partially digested in the intestines and behaves much like fiber in the digestive tract. Is 45 – 65 percent as sweet as sugar and does not tend to lose its sweetness or break down during the heating process. Isomalt absorbs little water, so it is often used in hard candies, toffee, cough drops and lollipops.

Lactitol: Made from milk sugar (lactose). Lactitol is partially absorbed as glucose by the body and the remaining amount is fermented in the large intestine. Therefore may cause distress in the large colon. 30-40 percent as sweet as sugar, but its taste and solubility profile resembles sugar so it is often found in sugar-free ice cream, chocolate, candy, baked goods, preserves and chewing gums.

Maltitol: Made by hydrogenation of maltose obtained from starch. 75-90% percent as sweet as sugar. It gives a creamy texture to foods. And since it is so like sucrose it is found often. Maltitol is slowly absorbed in the intestine and excessive consumption can have a laxative effect and produce intestinal gas, bloating, and diarrhea.

Mannitol: Is mainly extracted from seaweed for use in food manufacturing. Has 50-70 percent of the relative sweetness of sugar. Mannitol lingers in the intestines for a long time and therefore often causes bloating and diarrhea. Mannitol is found in a wide variety of natural products, including almost all plants. Mannitol is extracted by utilizing ethanol, water, and methanol to steam and then hydrolyze the raw material. Mannitol does not absorb moisture and is used to dust chewing gum to prevent it from sticking.

Sorbitol: Is manufactured from corn syrup. 50 percent as sweet as sugar. It is often an ingredient in sugar-free gums and candies. Is found naturally in fruits and vegetables. It has less of a tendency to cause diarrhea compared to mannitol but can also aggravate irritable bowel syndrome.

Xylitol: Is also called “wood sugar” and can be extracted from corncobs, birch wood, raspberries, plums, vegetables, mushrooms and some cereals. Xylitol has the same relative sweetness as sugar. It is found in chewing gums. Xylitol is produced by hydrogenation of the raw material, which converts the sugar into an alcohol. Tooth friendly.
 
____

Tagatose: Milk sugar – 92 % as sweet as sugar yet with about 1/3 of the calories. Is made via a patented two-step process. In the first step, lactose is hydrolyzed to glucose and galactose. In the second step, galactose is isomerized to D-tagatose by adding calcium hydroxide. D-tagatose is then further purified by means of demineralization and chromatography. The final product is a white crystalline substance that is greater than 99 percent pure. Only 15-20 percent of tagatose is absorbed in the small intestine. The major part of ingested tagatose is fermented in the colon by indigenous microflora, resulting in the production of short-chain fatty acids. The short chain fatty acids are absorbed almost completely and metabolized. Therefore tagatose has a minimal impact on blood glucose and is very low calorie.* Brand names Shugr, Sweet Fiber, and TheraSweet.

Turbinado Sugar: (Also known as Sugar in the Raw) Is made by crushing sugar cane to squeeze out the juice. The cane juice is evaporated and spun in a centrifuge, or ‘turbine’, producing large crystals. It retains a bit more of the natural “impurities” and a slight molasses flavor.

Article copied from:

http://www.inspirationgreen.com/all-the-different-sugars.html
NY Times – “Is Sugar Toxic
Soda Info Site: education.wichita.edu
USC Research Finds Sodas Sweetened with More High Fructose Corn Syrup Than Previously Assumed — keck.usc.edu
Sugar Alcohols: www.marksdailyapple.com
141 Reasons Sugar Ruins Your Health: nancyappleton.com

Cancer and Sugar

I have been reading a new book Titled: The Cancer Killers: The cause is the Cure.  It is a great book and I would recommend it to anyone!

One of the main reason why I have changed my diet is to prevent Cancer to the best of my ability.  Since working in the medical field I see alot of cancer and how it effects individuals, families and the overall population. It truly breaks my heart. In my transition I went from a junk food candy craving gal to a here and there sweet tooth.  Don’t get me wrong, I still struggle with wanting my sweets on a daily basis but i choose to only indulge is a VERY small amount maybe twice a week.  Mainly I just try to limit it as much as possible.  Knowing myself I can not tell myself I will never have sweets again because that just makes me crave them all the more. I have previously read several articles talking about Cancer and how it THRIVES on sugar. Ironically we feed cancer patient s ENSURE which it’s number 1 ingredient is sugar.  So we are feeding their cancer vs suffocating it.  That has stuck with me and since to the best of my knowledge and blessings I do not have cancer so I feel that the occasion intake of sugar if OK. If anyone is dealing with cancer I would highly recommend read this book and ELIMINATING sugar,  limiting even fruits, from your diet.

Did you know that the average person takes in about 1/2 a lb of sugar a day. The recommended intake of additional sugar (not including natural sugars like fruits and vegetables) is 4 tsp or less per day.  This can be figured by take the total number of sugar grams and dividing it by 4= tsp.

So if we are going to eat a little extra sweetness what should we choose?  My research is leading me in the way of Natural Herb Stevia or Xylitol .  Honey is OK but it does cause a rise in blood glucose levels- this is what I have been using so I am going to be making a change. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE stay away from natural process sweeteners.  They are lab produced and God did not make our bodies to digest them. I am looking into Beet sugars etc as well so stay tuned for that.

Below are 3 articles.  One is talking about the benefits of xylitol and the other is talking about RAW foods CURING cancer.  I wish that we could educate more people about the effects of food choice, lifestyle choices and environmental effects on our health and that we can make a difference!

I may not have cancer but I plan to incorporate these cancer fighting foods and tips into my lifestyle to in hopes to prevent ever getting it.

So check them out!:

(NaturalNews) The prevalent use of refined white cane sugar as a sweetener in foods and drinks is a serious contributing factor for a wide range of diseases, including cancer. Many alternatives, including aspartame and high-fructose – often GMO – corn syrup, are often even more dangerous to health than sugar. An excellent and unique alternative is xylitol, a sugar-like sweetener which is actually highly beneficial for health. Here is why.

For many generations, families have used the ubiquitous refined white cane sugar for sweetening drinks and foods, completely oblivious to the many health consequences.

In 2009, 50% of Americans were consuming at least half a pound of refined sugar per day in food and drink products, an incredible 180 pounds of refined sugar per year.

These are just a few of the adverse health consequences potentially arising from the use of refined cane sugar in any food or drink:

• Causes acidosis, the origin of a vast array of serious diseases
• Feeds “bad,” pathogenic bacteria in the gut, weakening the immune system
• Feeds cancer cells making primary use of sugar to multiply and grow
• Causes tooth decay
• Contributes to diabetes
• Contributes to obesity
• Causes an energy deficit, experienced as tiredness and fatigue
• Affects brain function through B vitamin and “good microbe” depletion
• Leaches vital vitamins and minerals from bones and other parts of the body
• Converts to fatty acids which are deposited in the heart, kidneys and other organs

There are literally hundreds of further deleterious effects to health.

While alternative natural sweeteners such as maple syrup, stevia, agave, molasses, fructose and others avoid some or many of these issues, they still often fail the body in two main areas – they feed bad microbes in the gut and therefore weaken the immune system, and they cause the body to become more acidic, the root of countless health conditions.

Why xylitol is so different from sugar and highly beneficial to health

Although xylitol looks, tastes and behaves exactly like a sugar, it is actually not a sugar at all but a “sugar alcohol.” This does not mean that it is alcoholic but that it contains five carbon atoms as opposed to the six carbon atoms of a sugar.

Xylitol is all natural, being extracted mostly from the bark of birch trees, the original source, but also from many other fibrous vegetables. A word of caution – xylitol is being increasingly made from corn husks. Corn husk xylitol should always be avoided on the basis that the corn from which it was processed may well be GMO.

Here are just a few of the numerous health benefits of xylitol

• Looks, tastes and behaves like sugar and is totally interchangeable
• Suitable for diabetics due to low glycemic index
• Antibacterial, antiviral for protecting against and fighting infections
• Antifungal, fighting candida, yeast and other fungal infections
• Alkalising, thereby helping to maintain the body at a healthy alkaline pH
• Probiotic and therefore feeds “good microbes” to strengthen the immune system
• Anti-pathogenic microbial, killing bad microbes that weaken the immune system
• Stabilizes insulin and hormone levels in harmony with the endocrine system
• Reduces craving for food and calories, thereby assisting weight loss
• Beneficial for helping sinus, ear and nose infections

Xylitol looks, tastes and behaves like sugar without all the harmful health consequences while being extremely beneficial for general health.

Sources:

http://nature.com

http://xylitol.org

http://science.naturalnews.com

http://www.naturalnews.com/042855_xylitol_safe_alternatives_sugar_substitute.html

(NaturalNews) There is a 75-year “CON” known as Western Medicine, but it’s a hush-hush topic in the news and in newspapers and magazines. Although medical doctors and surgeons are experts at fixing broken bones or removing animal fat from clogged arteries, the “pharmaceutical nation” known as the USA is caving in on itself, but nobody is allowed to talk about it on TV, or they lose all their sponsors. There is also a world of medicine known as organic food, but some people want to cook it, fry it, boil it or broil it, or even worse, grill it out, and that LIVE food becomes DEAD food, useless to the body, which needs nutrients for immunity, cellular health, vitality and sustainability.
(http://www.naturalnews.com)

Is there a “CANCER INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX” in the USA?

So why don’t oncologists talk about RAW foods, which are full of nutrients, oxygen for the cells (the cure for cancer) and the RAW REGIMEN when people are on their “death beds” or “sent home to die” with pancreatic cancer, liver cancer or cancer of some other organ that you have to have to survive? When cancer spreads to the lymph nodes or the spinal column, why don’t doctors, surgeons and oncologists tell their patients about these RAW foods that give them the best chance at recovery? And I mean permanent remission and recovery. Are these “Western Medicine” practitioners evil, money-grabbing cons or are they just ignorant, miseducated and unknowing? How could that be? How could you be trained to do surgery or read lab results and not know ONE THING about nutrition? Do some of them know but are not saying because their income would drop to about 25% of what they make now, using dangerous chemicals to treat a chemical-driven disease? No oncologist in the world suggests medicinal mushrooms, and take a big guess why! (http://www.canceractive.com)

The answer to every one of the questions above is to just listen to the people who DO KNOW about RAW foods and can tell wonderful stories of their own recovery from deadly cancer and why they chose nutrition over chemo, surgery and radiation. Learn from honest souls who share their most personal journeys, through and past the “cons” of the cancer-industrial complex. Consider the fact that even scientists have found a natural cure for cancer, and people TESTIFY in court that it works, even for children with “terminal” cancer: (http://www.burzynskiclinic.com).

Natural News has a few other heart-warming stories about real people who survived “lethal” cancer and lived to share their stories with the world: Jay Kordich, known as the “father of vegetable juicing,” says raw foods are responsible for overcoming his own bladder cancer. One of his followers, John Kohler, has been on a raw food diet since 1995, primarily enjoying juices. Not only did he survive his spinal meningitis, but he also lost weight and is living life more healthfully than ever.
(http://www.naturalnews.com)

Don’t Eat Cancer

Put it this way: if you were getting sick from moldy bread, would you look for a cure from a vaccine, or medicine, or consider surgery, while you kept on eating more moldy bread every day? It’s not that hard to filter chemicals from your daily intake. Check out Fooducate – the free phone app that scans the barcodes of foods and drinks, tells you if it’s GMO and rates it for quality! (http://www.fooducate.com)

Check out great RAW FOOD regimens: (http://www.naturalnews.com).

One-and-a-half million people every year fight cancer and need to know about RAW foods, and we could end this “search for the cure” that the masses are CONNED into believing is worthwhile. The cure is here! The cure lives in nutrition. Appreciate the fact that… if you don’t “eat” cancer, it doesn’t “eat” you.
(http://programs.webseed.com)

Sources for this article include:

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.fooducate.com

http://www.burzynskiclinic.com

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.canceractive.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

ttp://www.naturalnews.com/042848_organic_produce_cancer_cure_sick_car_industry.html

Nutritional Healing from Cancer:  The Fundamentals of an Alkaline Diet

There is something that every cancer patient should hear from their oncologist when they are first diagnosed.   They should be told that by making certain dietary changes, they could increase their chances of healing from cancer dramatically, no matter what course of treatment they pursue.

Cancer patients should be informed that nutrition is their first and best defense when starting down the path of healing from cancer.  Information should be provided about how to switch to an alkaline diet,[i] composed of primarily vegetables, with a small amount of fruit, grains and protein.  This diet is similar to the ketogenic[ii] diet, which is much discussed in the oncology press, but with further reduction in total protein consumption as well as grains, processed fats and sugar, to help control inflammation in the body.

Instead, the dietary information provided to cancer patients is an afterthought, and amazingly, usually includes foods and meal preparation techniques that are known promoters of cancer progression.[iii]  Clearly, there is a disconnect between very well documented information on diet and cancer progression and those who communicate most often with cancer patients – the oncology teams.

The modern way of life, particularly in fast-paced Western countries, does not lend itself to an anti-cancer, alkaline diet.  Convenience food products, microwave meals, packaged snacks and fast food dominate many people’s daily menu.  It should come as no surprise that these foods are not optimal if you are battling cancer.

But what should a newly diagnosed cancer patient do, right away, to help themselves prepare for the treatments to come and increase their chances for healing?

Here are the six most important dietary changes every cancer patient should make.  While they seem daunting at first, really what the cancer patient needs to do is to go back to eating in the way that people have done since the beginning of time:  fresh food, in season, simply prepared.

Most people in the Western world today eat a diet that promotes inflammation and increases intracellular pH, a condition called latent acidosis – understood to provide a perfect environment for cancer to proliferate.  A properly constructed alkaline diet will improve your intracellular pH over time, and is the best defense against continuous inflammation in the body.  It is composed primarily of organic leafy green vegetables, herbs and spices, root vegetables, onions, garlic, leek and chives, broccoli, cauliflower and cabbages, beans, lentils and peas and nuts and seeds, combined with a small amount (a cup or two per day) of non-gluten grains such as rice.  A serving of between two and four ounces of clean fish, organic poultry or grass-fed meat, several times per week, can be part of a healthy, alkaline oriented diet.  Two to three pieces of whole fresh fruit a day help balance your vitamin and mineral consumption.  The more of your vegetables and fruits you enjoy raw, the better.[iv]

Cancer cells use more glucose (sugar) per unit of time than other cells.  Sugar metabolism creates acid, which also supports cancer progression.  Further, a diet high in sugars, including fruits, triggers the insulin response.  If you frequently eat sugar or fruit throughout the day, you suppress your immune function while increasing the insulin levels in your body, creating insulin resistance.  Insulin resistance has been directly tied to cancer proliferation.   Processed sugar depletes magnesium in the body, another contributor to cancer proliferation.  High fructose corn syrup, because of its processing methodology, is high in mercury, a cancer-promoting toxin in the body.  The recommendation to eliminate sugar includes sugar in all its forms, even “natural” sugars like honey and agave, as well as white sugar and high fructose corn syrup.  Enjoy unsweetened applesauce, two or three figs or dried apricots, or a piece of fresh pineapple if you need a sweet treat.  Moderation with fruit is important, as fructose has been shown to increase the rate of cancer cell division as much as two-fold – more than other forms of sugar.[vi]

Glutinous grains cause inflammation.  Inflammation promotes cancer progression.   This means avoiding high-gluten grains such as wheat, spelt or rye, including the whole grains.  Pastas, cereals, bread, muffins, cakes, crackers, cookies and other baked goods are excluded from an alkaline, cancer-suppression diet.  Cancer patients should enjoy whole, non-gluten grains such as rice, buckwheat, quinoa, millet and amaranth.  However, using “gluten free” prepared products is a mistake, as most of them have added sugar or processed oils and will therefore fall outside of the alkaline diet parameters for cancer.

Cow dairy has been identified in a very large study compiled by Prof. (Emeritus) T. Colin Campbell, PhD, Cornell University as one of the most cancer promoting foods.[viii]  Strangely enough, it is the protein that is the culprit – casein protein.  High protein yogurts made with added powdered milk or whey are even more cancer promoting than plain milk, yogurt or cheese.  However, all dairy products should be eliminated from the diet when you are fighting cancer.  Dairy products create inflammation, cause bone deterioration (yes it is true, because of the high acid production during digestion of dairy) and promote cancer progression in a similar fashion to sugar.

Use only natural, cold-pressed olive oil, coconut oil or avocado oil – organic where possible.  These oils are naturally anti-inflammatory, thus provide a soothing and healing benefit to inflamed and potentially cancerous cells in the body.  Coconut oil in particular has also been shown to have a mild antibacterial/antifungal effect, helpful for cancer patients with a lowered immune function, as well as direct anti-cancer properties.  Oils that should be eliminated from a cancer-suppression diet include corn, soy, canola, safflower or sunflower oils.    Not only are the commercial versions of these oils produced from genetically modified plants – believed to increase cancer risk – most of them are highly processed.  Processed oils, including hydrogenated (hard) oils and margarines, have been prepared at high heat to improve shelf life.  This changes the oil molecules so that instead of acting as a natural conductor for all the electrical messaging in your body, these molecules create “dead spots” in your cells because they cannot conduct electricity.  This interferes with healthy cell function and can promote cancer progression.  Essentially cancer cells are cells that no longer respond to intracellular messaging and proliferate without purpose, impacting other cells.

Eliminate alcohol consumption.  Eliminate the consumption of bottled, canned or frozen fruit juice as they have high concentrations of sugar and many are highly acid forming.  Fresh vegetable and fruit juice that you make at home or from a juice bar is encouraged, however emphasis is on vegetable juice.   Reduce coffee consumption to one cup per day or less, and increase consumption of clean water, lightly brewed green tea (not black tea), sage tea, ginger tea and peppermint tea as both hot and cold drinks.  Drink the juice of a whole, organic lemon in hot or cold water several times per day.  Drink fresh carrot or carrot-beet juice daily, as these are healthy, alkaline juices for a cancer diet.

While this may sound daunting if you have enjoyed the convenience of restaurant or fast food meals or purchasing a prepared meal, this switch is easier than you think.  If you cook at home, it means eliminating a few foods and focusing on a few others to modify your usual recipes.

Salad is always a good choice whether at home or eating out.  Whether you are making your own salad or ordering a salad in a restaurant, include grated carrots, beets, cucumbers, endives, escarole, cherry tomatoes, fennel, cabbage and spinach in any combination, in addition to or instead of romaine lettuce or mesclun greens, then dress with extra virgin olive oil and fresh lemon on the side at table, rather than tossing the salad with prepared dressing.  Add some garbanzo or white beans and you’ll be completely satisfied.

Japanese sushi traditionally features a large selection of fresh vegetable rolls.  If you are dining out, ask for gluten-free (tamari) soy sauce, order a few rolls and some Japanese green tea, and you can enjoy a quick, satisfying lunch or dinner.  A bonus comes in the seaweed wrappers – full of minerals from the sea.  Just avoid standard soy sauce as it has wheat in it (gluten), the Teriyaki sauce (gluten) as well as anything that is brightly colored or contains mayonnaise, as these are not on the list of healthy options.  For immune deficient cancer patients, best to stay away from raw fish sushi.

Indian food features many vegetarian choices, with plenty of spice and vegetables.  Unfortunately many Indian restaurants use a lot of rape-seed/canola oil in cooking, which is not recommended.  Enquire about how the food is prepared and if there are some ingredients that are not optimal, just eat carefully.  A good choice is channa masala (chickpea curry) with poppadum (lentil cracker-bread) and vegetable biryani rice.  Nann, chapatti, paratha, puri and roti breads are typically made from wheat flour and should be avoided.

Italian cuisine is a bit more difficult since the basis of Italian cuisine is pasta made from wheat with added cheese.  However, cooking at home you have endless options, and more Italian restaurants are offering a gluten free pasta choice.  Many Italian menus feature dishes based on marinara (vegetarian) tomato sauce.  Select preparations with no cheese and only eat a small appetizer portion of fish or meat, if any at all.  Steamed or lightly sautéed vegetable dishes such as broccoli rabe or spinach with garlic are superior alkaline choices, as are salads made with chopped and grated raw vegetables.  Since olive oil, garlic, tomato, vegetables, herbs and lemon are critical to Italian cooking, it is quite possible make excellent alkaline selections if you order thoughtfully or cook Italian food at home.

And of course, you have to just let the breadbasket and the desert list pass you by.

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/nutrition-information-every-cancer-patient-should-know

Applesauce Blueberry Muffins

1 cup oats
1 cup vanilla almond milk
1 cup quinoa flour
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 honey
1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
2 egg
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp honey
blueberry’s
optional: chia or flax seeds, nutritional yeast.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Combine all ingredients and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. Gently, fold in blueberry’s. Spoon muffin mixture into muffin pan. Bake for 20-25 minutes.